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What's the Word: CARAPACE

pronunciation: [KER-ə-pays]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: French, 19th century

 

Meaning

1. The hard upper shell of a tortoise, crustacean, or arachnid.

2. Something regarded as a protective or defensive covering.

 

Example:

"The trickiest part of eating a lobster is removing the meat from the carapace."

"Humor can serve as a carapace to protect someone from their more complex and private emotions."

 

About Carapace

“Carapace” comes directly to English from the French “carapace,” as well as the Spanish “carapacho,” which refers to the shell covering the back of a turtle.

 

Did You Know?

While “carapace” originally referred to tough outer shells on certain animals and insects, it also has a more modern symbolic use. As a metaphor, “carapace” describes some means of defense. For example, actor Hugh Jackman plays the character Wolverine with a carapace of aggressive hostility, but he has a soft spot for helping underdogs, and Jackman himself is known for his well-mannered gentleness.

 

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What's the Word: ATARAXY

pronunciation: [AD-ə-rak-see]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Greek, 17th century

 

Meaning

1. A state of serene calmness.

 

Example:

"Many people achieve ataraxy through exercise and meditation."

"Upon arriving home and petting my dog, I was filled with ataraxy."

 

About Ataraxy

“Ataraxy” is based on the Greek “ἀταραξία,” meaning “impassiveness” or “lack of disturbance.” It entered English from the French “ataraxie” in the early 1600s.

 

Did You Know?

“Ataraxy” is sometimes used as a synonym for “deep relaxation” or “serenity.” However, the idea was developed by Stoic philosophers in ancient Greece who used “ataraxy” to describe a state of emotional balance that resulted from living in harmony with nature. The Stoics also thought ataraxy could be achieved by abandoning passions in favor of reason. While today ataraxy might be associated with a pleasant evening at home, Stoics encouraged soldiers entering battle to cultivate ataraxy, since mental stillness would help protect them in combat.

 

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What's the Word: CONCOMITANT

pronunciation: [kən-KAM-əd-ənt]

 

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, 17th century

 

Meaning

1. Naturally accompanying or associated.

 

Example:

"Arthur enjoys a big Sunday meal and the concomitant nap that follows."

"I like highway driving, but I don’t like the concomitant stress of driving in the city."

 

About Concomitant

“Concomitant” entered English from the Latin “concomitant,” meaning “accompanying.”

 

Did You Know?

McDonald’s Happy Meals, a children’s meal sold with a concomitant toy, debuted in 1979. However, over the years critics have argued offering toys and other concomitant gifts alongside fast food encourages unhealthy eating. As a result, San Francisco banned the sale of unhealthy meals featuring toys or games in 2010, in the hope of forcing meals featuring concomitant gifts for children to meet minimum nutritional standards. Companies found they could skirt this ban by offering the toys for sale at a very low price, rather than having them concomitant to the meal.

 

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