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New Game: What's the Word?

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21 hours ago, DarkRavie said:

What's the Word? - CRYPTONYM

pronunciation: [en-TEL-ə-kee]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, late 19th century

 

Meaning

1. A code name.

 

Example:

"Entrants’ names were replaced with cryptonyms to prevent any possible bias."

"The news referred to the member of the jury by a cryptonym to preserve anonymity."

 

About Cryptonym

Cryptonym developed from the combination of the Latin word “crypto” (hidden) + the word root “onym.”

 

Did You Know?

Some of the most recognizable code names are found in the White House. While code names were originally meant to keep the movements of important figures confidential, today these cryptonyms are used simply for tradition. Some notable code names from Presidents past include “Lancer” for President John F. Kennedy (a reference to Camelot and King Arthur’s court) and “Deacon” for President Jimmy Carter (a reference to his commitment to the Christian faith).

 

What's with the pronunciation?! :o 

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What's the Word? - BETIDE

pronunciation: [bə-TAHYD]

 

Part of speech: verb

Origin: Middle English, mid 1100s

 

Meaning

1. (Literary) Happen.

2. (With object) Happen to (someone).

 

Example:

"The couple promised to remain loyal to each other, whatever events may betide them."

"Woe betide any student who forgot their homework for the final day of class."

 

About Betide

This word originated from the now obsolete Middle English word “tide” (befall), which came in turn from the Old English word “tīdan” (happen).

 

Did You Know?

The phrase “woe betide you” comes from the common use of this medieval word. The word “tide,” an obsolete usage that originated from the equally obsolete Old English word “tidan,” used to mean “befall,” while “woe” means “distress.” When combined together, these words are meant to warn someone of the possible consequences of their bad behavior.

 

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What's the Word? - IRREFRAGABLE

pronunciation: [ih-REF-rə-gə-bl]

 

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, mid 16th century

 

Meaning

1. Not able to be refuted or disproved; indisputable.

 

Example:

"As a student, it was Kevin’s irrefragable right to play football on school property."

"It was an irrefragable truth that Wren was the best manager that the restaurant had ever employed."

 

About Irrefragable

This word finds its origins in the Latin word “irrefragabilis,” from the combination of the words “in” (not) + “refragari” (oppose).

 

Did You Know?

It takes a specific process to prove that a hypothesis is irrefragable. The scientific process gives a framework for testing and then verifying a hypothesis through producing repeatable results.

 

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What's the Word? - SOLATIUM

pronunciation: [sə-LAY-shee-əm]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, early 19th century

 

Meaning

1. (Formal) A thing given to someone as a compensation or consolation.

 

Example:

"Management gave all the customers who had been overcharged a free item as a solatium."

"Even though his dog came home on her own, Jacob still offered a solatium to everyone who had helped him search."

 

About Solatium

This word originated from Latin, and literally translates to “solace.”

 

Did You Know?

The word solatium was first used to describe compensation for emotional (rather than physical) injury in the 1800s. The solatia offered depends on the relationship between the two parties. While friends might exchange gifts to make up after a fight, a business likely offers monetary or physical compensation in exchange for any perceived wrongs — such as serving the wrong dish to a customer at a restaurant.

 

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What's the Word? - CREPITATE

pronunciation: [KREH-pə-tayt]

 

Part of speech: verb

Origin: Latin, early 17th century

 

Meaning

1. Make a crackling sound.

 

Example:

"The fallen leaves crepitated under his feet as he moved quickly through the woods."

"I could practically hear electricity crepitate beneath my fingers when I touched the plasma ball at the science museum."

 

About Crepitate

This word developed from the Latin word “crepitat” (crackled, rustled), which in turn developed from the verb “crepitaire” and “crepare” (to rattle).

 

Did You Know?

There’s possibly no crackling sound more celebrated than the way Kellogg’s Rice Krispies crepitate when milk is poured over them. The sounds were so popular, in fact, that Kellogg quickly turned them into a slogan, incorporating the phrase “Snap! Crackle! Pop!” into advertising in 1929. In 1933, an artist playfully created three elves to fit the names after listening to a radio advertisement, and his representation (with some tweaks) has endured into the modern day.

 

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What's the Word? - LEONINE

pronunciation: [LEE-ə-niyn]

 

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Late Middle English, 1350s

 

Meaning

1. Of or resembling a lion or lions.

 

Example:

"The leonine habitat was one of the top attractions at the zoo."

"The actor’s leonine face made him a popular choice for charming villains."

 

About Leonine

While this word as an adjective developed in Late Middle English by way of Old French, it originally comes from the Latin word “leoninus,” derived from “leo” and “leon” (lion).

 

Did You Know?

While the word leonine might bring to mind the iconic image of a maned, male lion, they actually do very little in the wild. Instead, the core of a pride (a group of lions) are the females of the group, who are largely responsible for securing most of the food, raising offspring, and guarding territory.

 

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What's the Word? - OCHER

pronunciation: [OH-kər]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Middle English, 1350s

 

Meaning

1. An earthy pigment containing ferric oxide, typically with clay, varying from light yellow to brown or red.

2. A pale brownish yellow color.

 

Example:

"This artist’s work is characterized by her extensive use of yellow ocher."

"All of Mary’s enamel pots are a beautiful ocher color to match her kitchen walls."

 

About Ocher

This word developed in its modern sense through Middle English via the Old French word “ocre.” However, before then it developed in Latin by way of the Greek word ōkhra (yellow ocher).

 

Did You Know?

Ocher is a naturally occurring pigment found in minerals and the earth, in use since prehistoric times. Many characteristic yellow, red, and orange cave paintings and paleolithic artworks, most of which remain remarkably well-preserved, were done using ocher pigments.

 

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What's the Word? - RAILLERY

pronunciation: [RAY-lə-ree]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: French, mid 17th century

 

Meaning

1. Good-humored teasing.

 

Example:

"When John was the only one who fell for the prank, the crew engaged in a little raillery at his expense."

"The mayor took the raillery at the reception in stride."

 

About Raillery

This word developed from the French words “raillerie” and “railler” (to rail).

 

Did You Know?

The roast — a comedic event where a guest of honor consents to be subjected to raillery by comedians, fans, friends, and family members — originated in a New York nightclub in the 1940s. A roast usually consists of a blend of insult humor, teasing, and genuine compliments, with the goal of making the audience (and the guest of honor) laugh.

 

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What's the Word? - IMPRIMATUR

pronunciation: [im-PRIM-ə-toor]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, mid 17th century

 

Meaning

1. (in singular) A person's acceptance or guarantee that something is of a good standard.

2. An official license by the Roman Catholic Church to print an ecclesiastical or religious book.

 

Example:

"Father Matthews decided to seek an imprimatur for his book on religious symbols in the Catholic faith."

"His debut novel was marked with an imprimatur from the bestselling horror writer of the decade."

 

About Imprimatur

This word developed from the Latin word “imprimere” (let it be printed).

 

Did You Know?

The blurb is an example of imprimatur in the literary world. A blurb is a short promotional piece that accompanies a work; on a book, it can usually be found on the dust jacket, the back of the book, or sometimes on the cover. Seeing a blurb from a famous author or celebrity may persuade more people to buy and read it.

 

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What's the Word? - ZELIG

pronunciation: [ZEL-ig]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: American English, 1980s

 

Meaning

1. A person who is able to change their appearance, behavior, or attitudes, so as to be comfortable in any situation..

 

Example:

"Despite belonging to the PR Team, Harold was a Zelig who easily blended into any department."

"Rather than joining a clique in school, Cathy was a Zelig who made friends in different interest groups."

 

About Zelig

This word originated in American English in the 1980s based off of a Woody Allen character Leonard Zelig, the titular character in the movie “Zelig” (1983). Eponyms are not always proper nouns, but “Zelig” is usually seen capitalized.

 

Did You Know?

A Zelig is a person who is able to change their appearance, behavior, or attitudes to be comfortable in any situation. Similarly, a chameleon is a reptile who is able to change its physical appearance, but not to simply camouflage itself against a background as cartoons might make one believe. Instead, chameleons often change colors to regulate temperature, indicate changes in mood, and communicate with other chameleons.

 

 

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What's the Word? - ANAMNESIS

pronunciation: [an-əm-NEE-sis]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Greek, late 16th century

 

Meaning

1. The remembering of things from a supposed previous existence (often used with reference to Platonic philosophy).

2. (Medicine) A patient's account of a medical history.

 

Example:

"The character spends most of the movie trying to resolve her anamnesis with her current life."

"The nurse collected Mr. Collins’ anamnesis while the doctor continued his checkup."

 

About Anamnesis

This word originated from the Greek word “anamnēsis,” which means “remembrance.”

 

Did You Know?

Experiencing déjà vu — intense feelings of having experienced something before — is often attributed to anamnesis, but may have a more practical explanation. Rather than remembering specific moments from another life, researchers believe that déjà vu occurs because of a few different possibilities: a minor brain “glitch” where short-term memories can be confused with long-term memories, a memory that someone doesn’t properly remember, or possibly from a dream or other subconscious experience.

 

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What's the Word? - CORRIGENDUM

pronunciation: [kor-ə-JEN-dəm]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, early 19th century

 

Meaning

1. A thing to be corrected, typically an error in a printed book.

 

Example:

"The editor issued a corrigendum for the incorrect date in the final copy."

"The small typo didn’t merit a corrigendum, but the newspaper still received emails with a correction."

 

About Corrigendum

Corrigendum originates from the Latin word “corrigere,” which means to “bring into order.”

 

Did You Know?

Books go through a lengthy process to get to publication. Part of that process involves Advance Readers Copies (ARC), which are printed copies of books used for promotional purposes. Not only are ARCs distributed with bloggers, reviewers, and PR in order to create some buzz; it is also a way for authors, editors, and publishers to evaluate their work for corrigendums before the book is finally published.

 

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What's the Word? - REDOUTABLE

pronunciation: [re-DOW-də-bl]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Late Middle English, mid 1300s

 

Meaning

1. (humorous) (of a person) Formidable, especially as an opponent.

 

Example:

"He was a redoubtable chess player, but still had to fight nerves before every match."

"John earned his redoubtable reputation after leading his team to several victories."

 

About Redoutable

This word developed in Late Middle English by way of the Old French word “redoutable,” which comes from the combination of the words “redouter” (to fear) + “douter” (to doubt).

 

Did You Know?

Video game developers specialize in creating formidable antagonists. The goal is for a game to start at a moderate amount of difficulty, which increases as the player progresses and becomes more familiar with the material. The main villain, often referred to as the final boss, is the most redoubtable character and the hardest to overcome.

 

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What's the Word? - PRIMACY

pronunciation: [PRY-mə-see]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Late Middle English, 1350s

 

Meaning

1. The fact of being primary, preeminent, or most important.

2. The office, period of office, or authority of a primate (chief bishop or archbishop) of certain churches.

 

Example:

"London has reaffirmed its primacy as the most visited city in the U.K."

"The Bishop’s primacy lasted well over ten years."

 

About Primacy

This word came into prominence in Late Middle English, but originally started out as the Old French word “primatie,” derived from the Latin words “primatia,” “primas,” and “primat” (which all mean “of the first rank”).

 

Did You Know?

The development of the American highway system welcomed the primacy of automobile travel. The Interstate Highway System was approved in 1956 under President Eisenhower. Regular automobile traffic spread across the network of roads, but interstate commerce and trucking also expanded, thanks to the highway system.

 

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - CAPSTONE

pronunciation: [KAP-stohn]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Middle English, 1350s

 

Meaning

1. A stone fixed on top of something, typically a wall.

2. (Archaeology) A large flat stone forming a roof over the chamber of a megalithic tomb.

 

Example:

"Timothy chose white capstones for the top of the wall for the way they reflected the light."

"The capstone was several hundred pounds, and it took all the assembled archaeologists some time to pry it loose."

 

About Capstone

This word originated in Middle English from a combination of the words “cap” and “stone,” and references the stone that often “caps” the top of an architectural structure, such as a wall.

 

Did You Know?

Capstone can be an architectural or archaeological term, but it also applies to other academics. A capstone can be an academic thesis students use to demonstrate their knowledge through a final body of work. A poetry student might create a portfolio focusing on a particular subject or technique for their capstone. What a capstone project looks like depends on the career path a student is pursuing.

 

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What's the Word? - EQUABLE

pronunciation: [EK-wə-bl]

 

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, mid 17th century

 

Meaning

1. (of a person) Not easily disturbed or angered; calm and even-tempered.

2. Not varying or fluctuating greatly.

 

Example:

"Dad is easier to bargain with because of his equable personality."

"The sea was equable and glassy, with not a single wave in sight."

 

About Equable

Equable’s modern definition of “fair and equitable” comes from the Latin words “aequabilis” and “aequare” (make equal).

 

Did You Know?

If the continual temperature fluctuation in a climate with four seasons seems rough to handle, it might be time to seek out an equable climate. An equable climate is one that has very little temperature variation. Some parts of Florida and California, for example, largely experience the same temperatures throughout the year, making them popular destinations for retirees and snowbirds.

 

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