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New Game: What's the Word?

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Friday's Word

 

What's the Word? - MAECENATISM

pronunciation: [may-SI-nə-tɪz-əm]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, early 17th century

 

Meaning

1. Patronage.

 

Example:

"The museum honored the donors at a reception for their maecenatism."

"Thanks to the maecenatism of regular shoppers, the local businesses were thriving."

 

About Maecenatism

This word originates from the classical Latin word "maecēnāt," which means a patron of the arts.

 

Did You Know?

The word maecenatism comes from the ancient Roman diplomat Gaius Maecenas. Besides being well-known for being a counselor to Emperor Augustus, Maecenas was famous for patronizing the arts — specifically literature and poetry.

 

Edited by DarkRavie
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What's the Word? - ANAGNORISIS

pronunciation: [an-ag-NOR-ih-sis]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Greek, late 18th century

 

Meaning

1. The point in a play, novel, etc., in which a principal character recognizes or discovers another character's true identity or the true nature of their own circumstances.

 

Example:

"My favorite part of a story is the big reveal that happens at the anagnorisis."

"The hallmark of Scooby Doo is the moment of anagnorisis when we finally get to see who is under the monster's mask."

 

About Anagnorisis

This word aims to make everything crystal clear: it originated from the Greek words "ana" (back) and "gnorisis" (to make known), which when combined literally means "recognition."

 

Did You Know?

The anagnorisis is important in many different stories — and some reveals are particularly surprising. One of the most famous examples was "The Empire Strikes Back," when audiences were shocked to find out that Darth Vader was actually Luke Skywalker's father.

 

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What's the Word? - HOLUS-BOLUS

pronunciation: [hol-əs-BOL-əs]

 

Part of speech: adverb

Origin: Unknown, mid 19th century

 

Meaning

1. All at once.

 

Example:

"Everything was happening holus-bolus, and I couldn't keep up."

"After a lull in my business, holus-bolus, I have all sorts of great opportunities."

 

About Holus-Bolus

Holus-bolus possibly originated as a pseudo-Latin rhyme based on the phrase "whole bolus" (all at once), but might also come from the Greek word "hólos bôlos" (clump of earth).

 

Did You Know?

When it seems like everything is happening holus-bolus (all at once), it might seem bad to procrastinate. However, sometimes taking a step back from something overwhelming is exactly what you need to figure out a different approach.

 

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What's the Word? - MANSUETUDE

pronunciation: [man-SOO-ə-tood]

 

Part of speech: noun

Origin: Latin, unknown

 

Meaning

1. Meekness; gentleness.

 

Example:

"Grant handled the difficult situation with the utmost mansuetude."

"It's important to approach the shelter animals with mansuetude."

 

About Mansuetude

Mansuetude developed through Late Middle English and Old French, but originated from the Latin words "mansuetudo" (gentle, tame) and the combination of the words "manus" (hand) + "suetus" (accustomed).

 

Did You Know?

Adopting a pet is exciting, and you might want to spend a lot of time playing with your adoptee immediately. However, experts advise mansuetude; give your new pet some room to explore and be gentle. As they get used to their surroundings, they'll warm up to you.

 

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - FELICITOUS

pronunciation: [fə-LIS-ə-dis]

 

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, 17th century

 

Meaning

1. Well-chosen or suited to the circumstances.

2. Pleasing and fortunate.

 

Example:

"It turned out to be a felicitous decision to bring an umbrella."

"She discovered a number of felicitous finds with her trusty metal detector."

 

About Felicitous

One of the definitions of felicitous is something that is well-chosen or suited to the circumstances. Similarly, something that is opportune occurs at a well-chosen or appropriate time.

 

Did You Know?

A truly felicitous occurrence is winning the lottery. Only 1 in 14 million people ever draw the correct numbers to win the lottery, making it a real stroke of luck to actually win a huge amount of money.

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