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New Game: What's the Word?

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What's the Word? - CURMUDGEON

Part of speech: noun 

Origin: Unknown, 16th century

 

meaning: 1. A cranky and unpleasant figure, usually an old man --- 2. A miserly person unwilling to share

 

"The curmudgeon next door banged on his wall anytime he heard my footsteps."

"I don't want to be a curmudgeon, but would pick up after your dog?"

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - MIASMA

Part of speech: noun 

Origin: Ancient Greek

 

meaning: 1. An unpleasant atmosphere --- 2. A poisonous, gaseous or noxious cloud

 

"Breaking out of the miasma of poverty is no easy task."

"The miasma left behind by the sewage truck made us all cover our mouths and noses."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - NASCENT

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: Latin, early 17th century

 

meaning: 1. New and untested --- 2. Emerging or budding

 

"My nascent basketball skills have a lot of room for improvement."

"The nascent product hadn't yet been tested, but everyone at the company had high hopes for its future impact."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - BOFFO

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: American English, 20th century

 

meaning: 1. Wildly successful or popular --- 2. Outstanding

 

"The actress delivered such a boffo performance that she won an Academy Award."

"The play had a boffo final act, resulting in a standing ovation from the audience."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - MONDEGREEN

Part of speech: noun 

Origin: English, 1950s

 

meaning: 1. A word or phrase that results from misheard language --- 2. A made-up lyric or line that replaces a song's real words

 

"Singing along with Hendrix, she belted out the mondegreen "Excuse me while I kiss this guy.""

"He raps so quickly that his fans know only mondegreens rather than the true words of his songs."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - HANDSEL

Part of speech: noun 

Origin: Old English or Old Norse

 

meaning: 1. A gift given for good luck --- 2. An initial payment

 

"My new business partner gave me a thoughtful handsel — she framed the first dollar we'd made — on our first week working together."

"We had to pay a handsel before the landlord would reserve the apartment for us."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - DECIDUOUS

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: Latin. 17th century

 

meaning: 1. In botany, shedding leaves annually or at certain points in the growth cycle --- 2. Transitory or ephemeral

 

"Come winter, the beautiful deciduous forest becomes barren and dull, and we wait for regrowth in the spring."

"I didn't realize the trees in my yard were deciduous, and every fall I have to rake fallen leaves on a daily basis."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - HALCYON

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: Ancient Greek

 

meaning: 1. Calm, serene or tranquil --- 2. A time in the past marked by peace and happiness --- 3. Of or relating to the halcyon bird

 

 

"I miss the halcyon days of my childhood when I didn’t have to worry about the pressures of adult life."

"Her halcyon lifestyle may seem wonderful, but it was earned by decades of hard work and determination."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - ABECEDARIAN

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: Late Latin, 17th century

 

meaning: 1. Of or relating to the alphabet --- 2. Arranged in alphabetical order --- 3. Basic, rudimentary

 

"Anyone with abecedarian interests should try out for the spelling bee."

"Please use an abecedarian system when you file these documents."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - VERDANT

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: French, late 16th century

 

meaning: 1. Bright green in hue --- 2. Green due to lush, growing vegetation --- 3. Inexperienced or fresh

 

"The verdant trees and plants of the Amazon rainforest are stunningly beautiful."

"Living in a drab city, I long for the verdant pastures of the countryside."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - ELEEMOSYNARY

Part of Speech: adjective 

Origin: Medieval Latin, late 16th century

 

meaning: 1. Of or relating to charity or donations --- 2. Supported by charitable giving

 

"Her generous eleemosynary pursuits fully funded a new animal shelter."

"The eleemosynary organization relies on donations to stay in business."

Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - SARTORIAL

Part of speech: adjective 

Origin: Latin, 19th century

 

meaning: 1. Of or relating to a tailor --- 2. Of or relating to fashion

 

 

"She makes excellent sartorial choices and is always impeccably dressed."

"I indulge my sartorial interests by visiting a tailor after every shopping excursion."
Edited by DarkRavie

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What's the Word? - TINTINNABULATION

Part of Speech: noun 

Origin: Latin, 19th century

 

meaning: 1. The ringing of bells --- 2. A tinkling sound, like that of a bell

 

"I always look forward to the joyous tintinnabulation at church during the Christmas season."

"The faint tintinnabulation in my ears is starting to drive me crazy."

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What's the Word? - HOARY

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Old English, 16th century

 

meaning: 1. Gray or white as a result of aging --- 2. Old

 

"The man's hoary appearance was antithetical to his jovial, youthful energy."

"The hoary stories I heard as a kid have been passed down for generations in my family."

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What's the Word? - ASSIDUOUS

 

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin. mid 16th century

 

meaning: 1. Showing exceptional effort and perseverance --- 2. Meticulous and diligent --- 3. Constant or incessant

 

 

"Her assiduous attention to detail in her work helped her land the big promotion." 

"He is an assiduous house cleaner—he doesn't leave a single surface untouched."

 

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What's the Word? - DEGUST

Part of speech: verb

Origin: Latin, early 17th century

 

meaning: 1. To carefully and thoughtfully savor food ---  2. To taste in small portions

 

"The experienced food critic would degust each dish with a discerning palate." 

"I prefer to degust every ingredient, and you can't do that if you inhale the food as soon as it's set in front of you."

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What's the Word? - VICINAL

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: French, early 17th century

 

meaning: 1. Adjacent, local --- 2. Of or relating to a neighborhood or limited area

 

 

"My dog's loud barking disturbed every vicinal household."

"When I dine out, I stick to vicinal restaurants that I can walk to from my house."

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What's the Word? - PATULOUS

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: Latin, early 17th century

 

meaning: 1. Open and expanded --- 2. Spreading out from the center, as the branches of a tree

 

"The patulous branches of the mighty oak tree extended 10 feet from its trunk."

"I spread the icing on the cake in a patulous, petal-like design, starting in the center."

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What's the Word? - DISEMBOGUE

Part of speech: verb

Origin: Spanish, late 16th century

 

meaning: 1. To flow out, as from the mouth of a river --- 2. To discharge --- 3. To pour out, leak

 

"The river began to disembogue from the dam, pouring debris into the lake."

"I didn't realize that the milk was beginning to disembogue from a hole in the bottom of the carton."

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What's the Word? - BRUSQUE

Part of speech: adjective

Origin: French & Italian, 16th century

 

meaning: 1. Very abrupt or curt --- 2. Rudely blunt

 

"Her short, brusque reply said more than any wordy explanation could."

"Rather than being brusque with customers, I try to listen and respond politely."

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