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'Into the Badlands' and 'The Son' Ending on AMC

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v9R94rn.jpgAMC announced Saturday at its portion of the Television Critics Association's winter press tour that dramas Into the Badlands and The Son would end with their upcoming runs.

 

Martial arts drama Into the Badlands will return for its final eight episodes starting Sunday, March 24. The Son, the Pierce Brosnan Western, will begin its second and final season on Saturday, April 27 at 9 p.m.

 

Neither drama were ratings breakouts for AMC — and both were on the more costly side of the spectrum for basic cable series. Badlands — produced in-house at AMC Studios — requires elaborate stunts and visual effects. The series is from showrunners Alfred Gough and stars Daniel Wu.

 

The Son, meanwhile, launched in April 2017 across multiple AMC-owned networks, including SundanceTV. Season one is averaging 2.3 million viewers and ranks as the top original cable program on Saturday nights. Although Saturday has traditionally been a quiet night for originals, AMC previously found success there airing later seasons of the Civil War-era drama Hell on Wheels. The series is based on Philipp Meyer's novel of the same name and is a co-production between AMC and Sonar Entertainment. Kevin Murphy serves as showrunner. 

 

The decision to wrap both Into the Badlands and The Son arrives as AMC is getting a programming influx from its sibling networks BBC America and Sundance in the form of critical darling Killing Eve and A Discovery of Witches, respectively. Both shows will premiere on AMC starting April 7. The two series will help fill a night of originals for AMC without any additional cost to the network. 

 

Once both The Son and Into the Badlands wrap their respective runs, AMC's scripted roster will consist of The Walking Dead and spinoff Fear the Walking Dead, Better Call Saul, Lodge 49, McMafia, NOS4A2, The Terror, Human, Preacher, Little Drummer Girl and Dispatches From Elsewhere. The cabler also put Peter Moffat-Michael B. Jordan racial drama 61st Street in development under its script-to-series model.

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13 minutes ago, cloud369 said:

Damn, I actually liked Into the Badlands, sucks that it's going away.

Personally, I was on the fence about dropping Into the Badlands, but if it's ending in 8 episodes, I'll go ahead and finish it.

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Which series get dropped or extended never made sense to me.  You have ones that go on forever like the Big Bang Theory that just seems corny and then you have ones like APB, Cult and Class that get dropped after 1 season.  Some times, shows get pushed into days that are guaranteed to result in lower ratings though the show is actually quite good.  Seems like the viewers should pick which shows they want to watch, not TV Execs.

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16 minutes ago, GCMD said:

Which series get dropped or extended never made sense to me.  You have ones that go on forever like the Big Bang Theory that just seems corny and then you have ones like APB, Cult and Class that get dropped after 1 season.  Some times, shows get pushed into days that are guaranteed to result in lower ratings though the show is actually quite good.  Seems like the viewers should pick which shows they want to watch, not TV Execs.

There are a lot of factors involved. Such as how much the show costs to produce, licensing, how much they can make on merchandise, viewership numbers, etc.

 

Whether The Big Bang Theory is corny or not is debatable, but there's no denying it's THE most watched sitcom on air and makes more money by far than any of the others currently producing new episodes. It makes enough that the salary per episode for the 7 main actors/actresses combined is 5.5 million bucks. That's not including how much they earn on for everything else involved.

 

Lower ratings don't always equal a nail in the coffin as often times they can still make money with the royalties gained from places like Netflix licensing the rights to stream the show, etc. There's actually several shows that were saved due to making money elsewhere despite the show getting terrible viewership during it's run-time on television.

 

Then you have shows like The Expanse that was doing very well, but due to licensing costs, SyFy dropped it, only for Amazon to save it (yay!).

 

Some networks are prone to quickly dropping shows if it fails to hit a certain mark, while other networks will try hard to keep them around and draw in a crowd. So it depends a lot of the people behind the scenes as well as to whether they're willing to keep forking money out for a sinking ship or test their funds on a new property.

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