Jump to content
Salem

Can Enterprise SSDs be used on regular PCs?

Recommended Posts

Hey, guys I just got one question.

 

I just got a Samsung 3.84TB Enterprise SSD from someone (it was free), and I was wondering if it works on standard PCs.

 

I am aware that enterprise SSDs are mainly used for data centers, but I just wanted to know if I can add it to my PC with no issues.

 

Can it also be used as an OS drive?

Edited by Salem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'd say yes.

It's still a storage drive at the end of the day; just with better hardware/life expectancy since it's designed for 24/7 use. I immagine the read and write speeds would be similar, if not better.

Odd that I couldn't find a direct yes/no answer via search results. It's all comparisons of enterprise vs consumer storage. :S

 

Edited by EmptyBasket

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some Enterprise SSD's are SAS Drives on SATA. All you need is the Controller for the SSD. 

 

SAS%20vs%20SATA.jpg

 

SAS SSD's are not compatible with SATA Controllers. So if the SSD is a SAS Drive you will need to get a controller for for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/27/2016 at 1:40 AM, Salem said:

Samsung 3.84TB Enterprise SSD

According to Samsung's website:

 

INTERFACE
SATA 6Gb/s 
(compatible with SATA 3Gb/s & SATA 1.5Gb/s)

http://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/product/enterprise/pm863a.html

 

So yes it would be able to. Like Beave said, if the plugs fit, it will work. 

 

On 12/27/2016 at 1:40 AM, Salem said:

Can it also be used as an OS drive?

What do you think the data centres put their OS onto? :P (Probably PCI-e versions but anyways...).

Yes it can be, usually one would get a 128/256/512GB SSD, place the OS onto that, and use a traditional 4TB HDD as storage. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the help guys! 

 

I just wanted to be sure since the term "Enterprise SSD" kinda scared me. Good to know it works like a regular drive.

 

8 hours ago, Moodkiller said:

...usually one would get a 128/256/512GB SSD, place the OS onto that, and use a traditional 4TB HDD as storage. 

 

I was going to use the normal Samsung 850 Pro (2TB) as my OS drive. But since I was given the 3.84TB SSD and the fact that I install a lot of programs I thought it would be appropriate to use that. Also I've read that Enterprise SSDs last longer so I thought why not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Salem said:

I was going to use the normal Samsung 850 Pro (2TB) as my OS drive. But since I was given the 3.84TB SSD and the fact that I install a lot of programs I thought it would be appropriate to use that.

 

What OS are you using? Windows? 7/8/10 32/64-bits 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/12/2016 at 6:04 PM, Salem said:

 

Windows 10 Pro 64-bit.

Cool ok, just a reminder, if you are going to use the 3.6TB as the primary drive, you need to set it to GPT (instead of MBR) for you to use the whole (3.6TB) as a single partition drive. MBR does not support partitions greater than 2TB, whereas GPT does. http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1923415/install-windows-3tb-4tb-larger-hdd.html

 

By the looks of things, Windows will set it up this way (GPT) for you from the beginning if doing a clean install? But Im not 100% sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Moodkiller said:

Cool ok, just a reminder, if you are going to use the 3.6TB as the primary drive, you need to set it to GPT (instead of MBR) for you to use the whole (3.6TB) as a single partition drive. MBR does not support partitions greater than 2TB, wh

 

By the looks of things, Windows will set it up this way (GPT) for you from the beginning if doing a clean install? But Im not 100% sure.

 

Don't worry I'm aware of this.

 

Usually if the drive is clean then Windows would set the drive to GPT instead of MPR.

 

But the important thing is for the motherboard to support UEFI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Salem said:

 

Don't worry I'm aware of this.

 

Usually if the drive is clean then Windows would set the drive to GPT instead of MPR.

 

But the important thing is for the motherboard to support UEFI.

Cool cool. 

And isn't that only for secure boot enabling? I'm pretty sure you can install Windows 10 on a non UEFI mobo: 

"For new devices that are launched a year after the release of Windows 10, they must have UEFI and Secure Boot enabled at the factory. This does not affect existing systems." - source

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Moodkiller said:

Cool cool. 

And isn't that only for secure boot enabling? I'm pretty sure you can install Windows 10 on a non UEFI mobo: 

"For new devices that are launched a year after the release of Windows 10, they must have UEFI and Secure Boot enabled at the factory. This does not affect existing systems." - source

 

 

From my understanding UEFI is a newer version of the BIOS interface which can support higher than 2TB capacities. Any BIOS Utility that has a GUI is UEFI. The older interface (regular BIOS) just has a blue screen with text.

 

This is what a UEFI interface looks like (look at the top left), it has a GUI:

Spoiler

ASUS%20X99-D%20BIOS%2001%20-%20EZ%20Mode

 

Whereas the old BIOS interface looks like this:

Spoiler

biosHead.gif

 

But again I'm not sure.

Edited by Salem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31/12/2016 at 10:24 PM, Salem said:

From my understanding UEFI is a newer version of the BIOS interface which can support higher than 2TB capacities.

Not such the case. I had a legacy BIOS with 2x 4TB's that it saw fine. Maybe your limitations would come into play with RAID setups? But for general storage, you're good :) 

 

On 31/12/2016 at 4:29 PM, Salem said:

But the important thing is for the motherboard to support UEFI.

I was going to ask why you stated this, but I see now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×