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DarkRavie

Crusader
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Everything posted by DarkRavie

  1. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - OMPHALOS Part of speech: noun Origin: Greek, 19th century meaning: 1. A central point or hub --- 2. A rounded stone (especially that at Delphi) representing the navel of the earth in ancient Greek mythology "The omphalos of his speech was a story about his rough childhood growing up in Ukraine." "Can you get to the omphalos of all this before I lose patience?" About Omphalos The filibuster is a legally-protected form of avoiding the omphalos of a discussion in Congress. It's used to delay votes by allowing a Senator to refuse to yield their speaking time. Some filibusters have lasted longer than 24 hours. Did you know? Omphalos refers to the center of activity, and, in Greek, it derives from the center of the human body—the navel, or umbilicus. It shares the same roots with what we call the umbilical cord.
  2. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    Anyone can post a word and give a brief definition with an example that uses the word in a sentence. I'll start. What's the Word? - INTREPID Part of speech: adjective meaning 1. Exhibiting fearlessness and endurance --- 2. Adventurous and bold The intrepid explorer blazed a path through the jungle brush with his machete. You must be intrepid if you want to be a reporter—you can't be afraid to seek the truth no matter where it might lead you.
  3. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Here's a new game. Write one fact about the topic called for. Everyday will be a new topic Fact of the day - CATS Did you know.... some cats are allergic to humans?
  4. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - SPACE SHUTTLE ENTERPRISE Did you know... that Space Shuttle Enterprise was the first orbiter of the Space Shuttle system? Rolled out on September 17, 1976, it was built for NASA as part of the Space Shuttle program to perform atmospheric test flights after being launched from a modified Boeing 747. Enterprise, the first space shuttle orbiter, was originally to be named Constitution, in honor of the Constitution of the United States. However, "Star Trek" fans started a write-in campaign urging the White House to instead select the name of the starship that James T. Kirk captained in the original TV series. Although President Gerald Ford did not mention the campaign, he directed NASA officials to change the name, saying he was "partial to the name" Enterprise. In recognition of their namesake, "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry and most of the principal cast of the original series were on hand when the shuttle Enterprise was rolled out of Rockwell's Air Force Plant 42, Site 1, Palmdale, Calif., assembly facility on Sept. 17, 1976. Enterprise was built for NASA to perform test flights in the atmosphere; lacking engines or a functional heat shield, it was not capable of actual spaceflight. NASA planned to eventually outfit Enterprise for spaceflight and to make it the second space shuttle to fly, after Columbia, but final design plans for the fuselage and wings of the orbiters changed during the construction of Columbia, and refitting Enterprise in accordance with the new plans would have required significant effort: Entire sections would have to be dismantled and shipped across the country to subcontractors. Instead it was deemed less expensive to build the space shuttle Challenger from existing materials. Once NASA completed its critical tests of Enterprise, the shuttle was retired from flight and partially stripped of certain components for use on other orbiters. It then went on an international tour, and in 1985 it was transported to Washington, D.C., where it was brought into the Smithsonian Institution's hangar at Washington Dulles International Airport for restoration. It was then installed at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center at the airport, where it was the museum's centerpiece until it was replaced by the space shuttle Discovery on April 19, 2012. Enterprise is now bound for its new home at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City.
  5. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - PROPITIOUS Part of speech: adjective Origin: Late middle English, 15th century meaning: 1. Auspicious or advantageous --- 2. Indicative of good fortune --- 3. Kind, gracious "My new car is a propitious sign that I'm on the right track." "The Queen's propitious behavior made her much beloved by the people." About Propitious Talk about a propitious occurrence: On October 14, 1912, Teddy Roosevelt was leaving a Milwaukee hotel for a campaign stop when he was shot in the chest. The bullet was propitiously slowed by the 50-page speech Roosevelt had in his pocket. He was able to deliver the speech that same day, saying "It takes more than that to kill a bull moose." Did you know? Though propitious and auspicious are very similar in meaning, there are some subtle differences between them. The former is generally used to describe things that help us achieve success, while the latter is more commonly used when foreshadowing success to come.
  6. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - MAGNETS Did you know... that magnets always have two poles -- even if you cut them in half? Magnetic monopoles do not exist --as far as we know. Magnets will always have two poles, a magnetic north and a magnetic south. If you don’t believe us, take a bar magnet and cut it in half. The two remaining pieces will still have a north and a south. You can cut it dozens of times and the results will be the same. The most powerful magnet in the universe is actually a star called a magnetar. These are stars that have died off and had a supernova explosion. The magnetars are what is left over, and they are strong enough to destroy small planets if they get close enough. Luckily, there are only a dozen of these according to scientists, and they are far far far away from Earth. Strong rare earth magnets can turn some metals into magnets. Ferromagnetic materials like iron can be magnetized with a strong permanent magnet. You can try it for yourself by rubbing a magnet on a screwdriver. The screwdriver will be able to pick up magnetic objects. The Earth is like one big bar magnet. It has a magnetic north and a magnetic south, which is what the needle on a compass points to. However, this is geographically different than the actual north and south poles. Invisible magnetic field lines run from the north to south poles. Magnetic resonance imaging machines use magnets, and they generate stronger fields than the Earth. In fact, it is about 60,000 times stronger than the Earth’s. Some animals are affected by magnets. Magnets have been used to study bee communication patterns, migratory cycles and several other animal behaviors. This is because many animals can sense magnetic fields. For instance, some sharks are repelled by them and birds and turtles navigate by them. Magnets are ancient. Well, today’s man-made magnets may not be so ancient, but the Chinese are said to have used lodestone, a natural magnet as far back as date. In fact, ancient mariners are said to have used lodestones to help them navigate. There are magnetic hills, said to pull cars and other large magnetic objects towards certain locations. However, researchers have found out that these are not really a magnetic anomaly as much as a topographical illusion.
  7. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - HUBRIS Part of speech: noun Origin: Greek, 19th century meaning: 1. Excessive pride and arrogance --- 2. Overconfidence leading to an eventual downfall "His hubris would not allow him to read the instructions. Consequently, his new TV fell off the wall an hour after he installed it." "Some professional athletes suffer from hubris and assume that their money will last forever." About Hubris One of the most famous examples of hubris, or excessive pride and self-confidence, is told in John Milton's "Paradise Lost," in which Lucifer's pride in seeing himself as wiser than God results in him being cast out into Hell and becoming the devil. Did you know? In Ancient Greece, seeing oneself as above the Gods was the greatest crime—one that inevitably led to downfall. Eventually, this concept of such extreme and fatal arrogance was given a name: hubris.
  8. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - SNOW GLOBES Did you know... that it is thought that snow globes originated in France in Europe, with the first known record being a globe of water and white powder, with a man holding an umbrella, which was on display at the Paris Universal Expo in 1878? It was an Austrian man named Erwin Perzy who is widely considered to be its proper “inventor,” albeit accidentally. In 1900, while living outside Vienna, where he ran a medical instrument–supply business, Perzy was asked by a local surgeon to improve upon Thomas Edison’s then-new lightbulb, which the surgeon wanted made brighter for his operating room. Drawing upon a method used by shoemakers to make quasi-“spotlights,” Perzy placed a water-filled glass globe in front of a candle, which increased the light’s magnification, and sprinkled tiny bits of reflective glitter into the globe to help brighten it. But the glitter sank too quickly, so Perzy tried semolina flakes (commonly found in baby food) instead. They didn’t quite work, either, but the appearance of the small, white particles drifting around the globe reminded Perzy of snowfall—and he quickly filed the first official patent for a snow globe, or Schneekugel. By 1905, he was churning out dozens of handmade snow globes—often featuring small church figurines made from pewter—through his company, Firm Perzy. They became so popular among well-to-do Austrians that in 1908, Perzy was officially honored for his treasured item by Emperor Franz Joseph I. Indeed, the snow globe appeared at a time when upper-middle-class families, newly wealthy following the Industrial Revolution, began collecting intricate, artistic objects and displaying them in their homes. Though it’s unclear exactly how much these early globes cost, they were expensive due to the amount of time necessary to paint, mold, and assemble them. After World War I concluded in 1918, a boost in tourism led to greater demand for eye-catching souvenirs—especially snow globes. Gradually, news of the whimsical trinket reached America. In 1927, a man from Pittsburgh named Joseph Garaja applied for the first snow globe patent there, and with it, he introduced a radical new method: underwater assembly. This ensured that each globe would be fully filled with liquid and saved a significant amount of time and money—transforming the snow globe from an expensive indulgence into the affordable commodity we know today. To read more, go to: A Brief History on the Snow Globe
  9. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - SYZYGY Part of speech: NOUN Origin: Greek, 17th century meaning: 1. The arrangement of three celestial bodies in a straight line --- 2. The metaphorical alignment of two people, ideas, or events "During an eclipse, Earth, the moon, and the sun are in perfect syzygy." "For the first time, I found myself and my coworkers in perfect syzygy regarding how we should proceed next." About Syzygy Syzygy, or a celestial alignment, between the sun and moon is responsible for tidal variations in the oceans. When the sun and moon are in a state of syzygy, their tidal forces compound on each other. This causes the ocean to both rise higher and fall lower than average. This occurrence happens twice each month. Did you Know? The word syzygy is used in a range of academic settings, from mathematics and medicine to psychology and zoology. In all of these disciplines, the word generally relates to the concept of two (or more) things relating or fusing together.
  10. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - PLASMA BALLS Did you know.... that a plasma ball (also sometimes called a plasma globe, lamp, dome, or sphere) is a clear glass ball filled with a mixture of noble gases with a high-voltage electrode at its center? Plasma filaments extend from the electrode to the glass when electricity is supplied, creating fascinating beams of colored light. The plasma ball was invented by Nikola Tesla when he was experimenting with high-frequency electric currents in a glass vacuum tube. That’s why the electrode at the center of a plasma ball is also often known as a Tesla coil. The modern plasma balls popular as novelty and educational items today were first designed by Bill Parker. William P. (Bill) Parker is an artist, scientist, and entrepreneur, best known for inventing the modern design of the plasma lamp. The invention occurred in 1971, when Parker was working as a student in a physics laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and accidentally filled a test chamber to a greaterthan-usual pressure with ionized neon and argon. Modern plasma balls are manufactured with a mix of various noble gases such as xenon, neon, and krypton. With various shapes in the glass globes, computerized circuits, and the gas combinations, the plasma balls can create electric tentacles that create various shapes and patterns in different colors. You can also find USB plasma balls which are powered from the USB port of for computer. They are a safer version, due to the low current from the PC. However, the voltage is still very high, and can cause harmful EMF radiation. Plasma balls are high voltage devices. Therefore one has to take precautions while using them. The plasma sphere can emit certain frequencies, which interfere with Wi-Fi signals and cell phones. So they must be kept away from such areas. These spheres also radiate electromagnetic waves. This can affect electric devices, hence they should be kept away from people with pacemakers. While using metal objects to create electric and fire tricks with the plasma globe, precautions such as protective clothing and insulation should be used. Never bring any flammable item near the globe. Magnets are usually good conductors of electricity. Hence, bringing plasma balls and magnets together create a potential for shocks and burns. Operating plasma balls for long periods of time can cause the formation of ozone gas, which is harmful to the body when you breathe it in.
  11. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - KERFUFFLE Part of speech: noun Origin: Scottish, 19th century meaning: 1. A commotion or noise --- 2. A chaotic scene caused by an altercation "Once the fight broke out, I lost my watch in the ensuing kerfuffle." "An argument over a boyfriend caused quite a kerfuffle in the high school cafeteria." About Kerfuffle More than a mere kerfuffle, but not quite an epic saga, the Anglo–Zanzibar War of 1896 is the shortest recorded war in history. While its duration has been the subject of debate, historians generally say it lasted only 38 minutes. Did you know? Kerfuffle is just one of many funny-sounding words to describe a noisy commotion. Others include brouhaha, hubbub, skirmish, and hullabaloo.
  12. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - LAURA SECORD Did you know... that Laura Secord (née Ingersoll; 13 September 1775 – 17 October 1868) was a Canadian heroine of the War of 1812? She is known for having walked 20 miles (32 km) out of American-occupied territory in 1813 to warn British forces of an impending American attack. Her contribution to the war was little known during her lifetime, but since her death she has been frequently honoured in Canada. Though Laura Secord had no relation to it, most Canadians associate her with the Laura Secord Chocolates company, named after her on the centennial of her walk. Laura Secord's father, Thomas Ingersoll, lived in Massachusetts and fought on the side of the Patriots during the Revolutionary War (1775–1783). In 1795 he moved his family to the Niagara region of Upper Canada after he had applied for and received a land grant. Shortly after, Laura married Loyalist James Secord, who was later seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights early in the War of 1812. While he was still recovering in 1813, the Americans invaded the Niagara Peninsula, including Queenston. During the occupation, Secord acquired information about a planned American attack, and stole away on the morning of 22 June to inform Lieutenant James FitzGibbon in the territory still controlled by the British. The information helped the British and their Mohawk warrior allies repel the invading Americans at the Battle of Beaver Dams. Her effort was forgotten until 1860, when Edward, Prince of Wales awarded the impoverished widow £100 for her service on his visit to Canada. The story of Laura Secord has taken on mythic overtones in Canada. Her tale has been the subject of books, plays, and poetry, often with many embellishments. Since her death, Canada has bestowed honours on her, including schools named after her, monuments, a museum, a memorial stamp and coin, and a statue at the Valiants Memorial in the Canadian capital.
  13. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - GREGARIOUS Part of speech: adjective Origin: Latin, 17th century meaning: 1. Highly sociable --- 2. Associating with others of the same group or type --- 3. Living or growing in a group or colony "My gregarious neighbor always sets up block parties and get-togethers." I"'m not that gregarious — I avoid big crowds and large events." About Gregarious Gregarious comes from a word referring to flocks or herds of animals. So what's the largest flock ever witnessed? That distinction is said to belong to the red-billed quelea bird of Africa, which was captured in a flock over 1.5 billion strong. Did you know? Gregarious comes from Latin words referring to herds or flocks. Even today, in more scientific uses, the word is used to refer to animals or plants that live in social groups.
  14. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - WATERFALLS Did you know... that a waterfall is a place where water flows over a vertical drop or a series of steep drops in the course of a stream or river? They often form in the upper stages of a river where it flows over different bands of rock. It erodes soft rock more quickly than hard rock and this may lead to the creation of a waterfall. Sometimes, the land formation causes a waterfall. If there is a cliff or ledge naturally, rushing river waters will simply fall over the edge. Waterfalls also occur where meltwater drops over the edge of a tabular iceberg or ice shelf. Waterfalls can have a wide range of widths and depths, and this diversity is part of what makes them such a charismatic and interesting natural phenomenon. Waterfalls are classified into 10 different types depending on the way they descend: • Plunge: Water descends vertically, losing contact with the bedrock surface. • Horsetail: Descending water maintains some contact with bedrock. • Cataract: A large, powerful waterfall. • Multi-step: A series of waterfalls one after another of roughly the same size each with its own sunken plunge pool. • Block: Water descends from a relatively wide stream or river. • Cascade: Water descends a series of rock steps. • Segmented: Distinctly separate flows of water form as it descends. • Tiered: Water drops in a series of distinct steps or falls. • Punchbowl: Water descends in a constricted form and then spreads out in a wider pool. • Fan: Water spreads horizontally as it descends while remaining in contact with bedrock Some waterfalls freeze. It happens like this: the water in the river/stream that supplies water to the waterfall supercools (when water experiences a temperature less than its freezing point without becoming a solid) when the temperature dips below the freezing point (around -6 degrees Celsius). This results in a gradual slowing down of the flow as water molecules begin to stick to each other and form tiny, solid particles of ‘frazil ice’. Frazil ice, which has an oily appearance when seen on the surface of water, is a cluster of loose, randomly-oriented ice crystals shaped like tiny needles. It usually forms in rivers, lakes, oceans, and other water bodies containing turbulent, open and supercooled water. Because waterfalls are so dramatic and dangerous, thrill-seekers like to perform stunts or events on or around them. People cross waterfalls on tightropes, in canoes, and even in barrels, which provide more protection. Many of these stunts, such as jet-skiing over Niagara Falls, do not go off as planned, and many daredevils have plunged to their deaths. Only two people are known to have survived a plunge from Niagara Falls without any protection. Those two men sustained serious injuries.
  15. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - OBSEQUIOUS Part of speech: adjective Origin: Latin, 15th century meaning: 1. Obedient or submissive --- 2. Attentive and compliant to the point of excess "His obsequious attitude meant he was always eager to please his superiors." "The hotel's butler was positively obsequious, constantly opening the door, carrying luggage, and calling a car for us." About Obsequious Often used as the ultimate metaphor for blind following, lemmings have long been believed to commit mass suicide by following each other obsequiously off of cliffs. The truth is that this behavior has never been naturally observed, and stems from a manipulated scene in a 1958 nature documentary from Disney. Did you know? Obsequious, a word used to describe followers, shares its Latin roots with words like sequel (a story that follows the first) and sequence (a series of numbers that follow each other.)
  16. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - FINGERPRINTS Did you know... that almost everyone has fingerprints? While your fingerprints are similar to those of other people's, no two people have the same fingerprints. Scientists have studied fingerprints, handprints, and other body prints, including the patterns on people's tongues. Biometrics is the science of studying human body characteristics. Fingerprints develop before babies are born. Your fingerprints are made of several layers of twisted skin that formed prior to your birth. These ridges of skin make patterns. Scientists studying fingerprints identified three main patterns of ridges: loops, whorls, and arches. Everyone's fingerprints are a combination of these patterns. While very, very rare, some people are born without fingerprints. Because of the raised skin patterns on our fingertips and palms, we are able to hold on to things. The ridges of the skin help you get a grip on objects that you are trying to grasp. Without them, things would slide right out of your hands! In the millions of fingerprints that have been collected and examined, no two identical sets of fingerprints have been found! Believe it or not, even identical twins have different fingerprints. This is why fingerprints are used to identify criminals. As people get older, their appearance may change - hair may turn gray or white or fall out, and the shape of the face might change. People grow mustaches or change hairstyles to alter their appearance. But one thing that does not change is their fingerprint pattern. Your fingerprints stay the same for your whole life. Many people think that the use of fingerprints for identification is a fairly new approach, but that isn't true. Archaeologists, or scientists who study history by digging up artifacts and bones have found that people in ancient Babylon used fingerprints. Babylonians who lived thousands of years ago put their fingerprints on clay tablets.
  17. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - BLATHERSKITE Part of speech: noun Origin: Scottish English, 17th century meaning: 1. nonsense --- 2. A person who is prone to speaking nonsense "I don't want to hear your blatherskite — I need you to speak clearly about things that really matter." "The teacher had great insights, but he was such a blatherskite that his students never understood them." About Blatherskite William Shakespeare's play, "Much Ado About Nothing," features a character named Dogberry who is a bit of a blatherskite — he speaks in nonsense throughout much of his time onstage. Did you know? We have the Scots to thank for this word, which originated from a slightly profane term. Thanks to its appearance in a Scottish song that was popular during the Revolutionary War, blatherskite lost its edge and became commonly used in American English.
  18. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day? - VENUS FLYTRAPS Did you know... that unlike most plants, Venus flytraps are carnivorous, which means they eat meat? Charles Darwin wrote in his 1875 publication, "Insectivorous Plants," that the Venus flytrap is "one of the most wonderful [plants] in the world." There's no doubt that this opinion was formed after watching the jaws of this plant snap around an insect, capturing it for a meal. Venus flytraps grow to around 5 inches (13 centimeters) in diameter. Each plant usually has about six stems with hinged leaves. The edges of the leaves are lined with "teeth," and the leaves fit together like a clamshell. When the leaves snap shut, they form a trap. An individual trap grows to around 1 inch (3 cm), according to The International Carnivorous Plant Society. Venus flytraps are native to North Carolina and South Carolina, but they have been introduced to other states, including Florida and New Jersey. They like the moist, acidic soil found in the understories of forests, according to the National Wildlife Federation. They also need high humidity and a lot of sunlight to flourish. The most interesting thing about this plant is how it eats. Flytraps lure insects by the reddish lining in the leaves and by secreting a fragrant nectar. When bugs land in the jaws of the flytrap, it doesn't clamp down right away. Sensory hairs, called trichomes, on the inside of the petals essentially count the movements from the insect. There must be at least two movements in 20 seconds or the petals won't close. This prevents it from trapping debris or other items that wouldn't make a good meal. On the second movement, the plant closes its jaws in under a second by snapping from a convex shape to concave shape. The bristles on the edges of the leaves work like jail bars to prevent the insect from making an escape. On the third movement, it starts to digest the insect. Digestive juices are introduced to the mouth area and they break down the insect. After five to 12 days, the plant will reopen and the parts of the bug that couldn't be digested fall out. The Venus flytrap's primary prey is ants, but it will also eat flies, beetles, slugs, spiders and even tiny frogs. Flytraps don't just eat bugs for nutrition, though. Like other plants, they also need water, gases and sunlight. Insects simply supplement their diet, according to the Botanical Society of America.
  19. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - ORGANON Part of speech: noun meaning: 1. A tool or instrument used to gain knowledge --- 2. A set of guiding principles for a particular science, philosophy or discipline "The internet was my organon of choice when doing research for school." "The scientist abided by an organon of peer-reviewed documents, books, and studies to inform her work." About Organon An organon is something (such as a textbook) used to help someone acquire knowledge, and the word stems from the Greek language. In fact, the "Organon" is a collection of six books by Greek philosopher Aristotle dealing with logic, all combining to create a definitive lecture still referenced today. Did you Know? Some scholars argue that we are living in the era of the greatest organon in human history: the internet. You're using it to gain knowledge right now!
  20. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - ANIME ROOTS Did you know... that anime has been around since the early 1900's? Believe it or not, anime did not begin with Sailor Moon or Pokemon (they were late to the party, originating in 1992 and 1997). Anime has been dated back to 1907, potentially even earlier – records of this time are spotty at best – as an extension of theatre. While Osama Tezuka is known as the anime expert, three men are thought to be the anime originators: Katsudo Shashin, Junichi Kouichi, and Seitarou Kitayama. THE THREE FATHERS (1907-1923) Film first hit Japan in 1896 and had flourished into burgeoning culture by the 1910s, complete with film criticism. Along with the initial wave of films from the west came Western animation. It was only a matter of time before Japan, with its rich visual culture, began experimenting with its own animated creations. The earliest example (speculated to be the oldest surviving anime) is Katsudo Shashin (Moving Picture, 1907?-1918?). The boy is writing the kanji for katsudo shashin which translates to "moving picture" in English. It seems that in these early years, both Japan and the west were amused enough with the novelty of an image in motion. In the early 1900s, animators experimented with inexpensive ways to bring their visions to life. Katsudo Shashin and many others were drawn directly onto the strips of film from which they were projected, making these animations one of a kind. This and other early animation techniques were pioneered by Oten Shimokawa, a political cartoonist for Tokyo Puck magazine. His first animated work, Imokawa Mukuzo Genkanban no Maki (The Story of the Concierge Mukuzo Imokawa, 1917) was long believed to be the first animated short made in Japan, though it is likely still the first short ever screened for a wide audience. After creating only five shorts, chronic health problems forced Shimokawa into early retirement. His contribution, however, gives him the honor as one of the three fathers of early anime. The second of the three fathers is Junichi Kouichi, who holds the honor of the oldest confirmed anime in existence (Katsudo Shashin could have been made as early as 1907, but there is no real proof as to its age). Namakura Gatana (Dull Sword, 1917) is a two minute short about a samurai attempting to test his newly purchased katana on innocent townspeople and failing miserably. This film was thought to be lost until a copy was found in an Osaka antique shop in 2008. Kouichi animated this short using paper cut-outs laid out on a table which he moved and changed to create the characters' movements. This was a technique that would later be taken to a level of artistic excellence by the Japanese animation directors of the 1930s. Junichi Kouichi began creating political propaganda in 1924 and retired from animation in 1930. The third father of this generation had arguably the most impact on the generation that followed him, mostly because he had the largest body of work and many animators of the 1930s were his students. Seitarou Kitayama created shorts focusing on Japanese folktales like Sarukani Gassen (Monkey-Crab Battle), Urashima Taro, and Momotarou. Aside from creating anime's first commercials and documentary, Kitayama stood apart from his contemporaries as the only animator to found his own studio. Kitayama Eiga Seisakujo opened in 1921 and gave jobs to a slew of talented individuals including Sanae Yamamoto. Sadly after only two years, most of Kitayama's studio was destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. He left Tokyo for a fresh start in Osaka the next year, but eventually abandoned animation completely for a career shooting newsreels.
  21. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - FESTOON Part of speech: verb Origin: French, 17th century meaning: 1. To decorate, embellish or ornament --- 2. To hang a decorative strip between two fixed points "Before the surprise party, I had to festoon the entryway with streamers and decorations." "College students love to festoon their dorm rooms with all kinds of trinkets." About Festoon One of the most iconic examples of festooning — or hanging a decorative string or banner — comes from Mexico. If you’ve traveled there, you may have seen bright, colorful flags with cut-out patterns hanging above the streets. These are known as papel picado, and have been used in traditional celebrations and in public spaces for centuries. Did you Know? A festoon (the noun) is the decorative string or banner you might hang from two points at a party. So, in theory, one could festoon a festoon.
  22. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - CINNAMON SPICE Did you know... that cinnamon tree belongs to the family Lauraceae? This plant can be found on Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, in Southern India, China and Indonesia. Cinnamon tree grows in tropical rainforests. People cultivate cinnamon tree because of its pleasant smell and spicy aroma. Two types of cinnamon, called true cinnamon and cassia, are grown for commercial use. They have different taste, smell and chemical composition. Cinnamon is best known as spice, but it also has numerous beneficial effects on human health and can be used in treatment of certain disorders. Oils extracted from the cinnamon tree are used in cosmetic industry. Cinnamon is made by cutting the stems of cinnamon trees. The inner bark is then extracted and the woody parts removed. When it dries, it forms strips that curl into rolls, called cinnamon sticks. These sticks can be ground to form cinnamon powder. The distinct smell and flavor of cinnamon are due to the oily part, which is very high in the compound cinnamaldehyde. Scientists believe that this compound is responsible for most of cinnamon's powerful effects on health and metabolism. Cinnamon oil, which sounds like a delicious addition to anything, destroys the hell out of mosquito larvae, as it turns out. So think of cinnamon as an environmentally friendly pesticide in a way by adding a few drops or sprinklings to your sunscreen or lotion. Back in the day — talking the first century A.D. here — cinnamon carried an ungodly price tag, especially in Rome. It was considered a precious commodity, given its high demand and low supply. Once the regularity of foreign exploration kicked in, the spice became more available and therefore more affordable. According to analysis and studies, cinnamon has been proven to be beneficial for those concerned with diabetes. There's also been studies that suggest cinnamon can lower lipid levels, such as LDL cholesterol and triglycerides.
  23. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - POLYGLOT Part of speech: noun Origin: Latin, 17th century meaning: 1. A multilingual person --- 2. A publication featuring one text in multilingual languages --- 3. A blend of languages "She's an accomplished polyglot, speaking seven different languages fluently." "I'm no polyglot — I barely have a grasp on English, let alone another language." About Polyglot Ziad Vazah might be the ultimate polyglot, or multilingual person. According to Guinness World Records, he knows more languages than anyone on Earth. Fazah can reportedly speak and read as many as 59 different languages. Did you Know? Polyglot can also be used as an adjective, meaning "multilingual." For example, a polyglot book is one that is written in multiple different languages.
  24. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - MONARCH BUTTERFLIES Did you know... that each summer in the United States and southern Canada, the beautiful, orange-and-black monarch butterfly can be seen flittering from flower to flower, foraging for nectar? They are the most beautiful and interesting creatures in the insect world, and they are a source of fascination for many. Monarch butterflies store a poison called Cardiac Glycosides that they had ingested by feeding on the leaves of the milkweed foliage in their larva stage. These are sometimes harmful to its vertebrate predators, but ineffective on invertebrate predators. The toxic effect on vertebrates however, depends on the level of intake. These toxins provide these butterflies with a poisonous defense against its predators such as lizards, birds, and frogs. Similar to the migrating birds, the monarch butterflies use the clear advantage of updrafts of warm air, called “thermals" and glide as they migrate, to preserve the energy required for flapping their wings all the through the long 2500 mile voyage from the Great Lakes in Canada to the warm Central Mexican Oyamel fir forests in the Michoacan hills. They rest there through winter and then complete their migration Northwards in search of milkweed plants in the Eastern United States. At the wintering sites in Mexico, they roost in the millions in huge groups in the trees. The females will lay their eggs on the milkweed leaves, and the cycle goes on until the next fourth generation starts the return migration to complete the cycle north in the spring.
  25. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - LOGY Part of speech: adjective Origin: Unknown, 19th century meaning: 1. Lacking vitality --- 2. Sluggish or lethargic "My parents did not appreciate my logy approach to cleaning the dishes." "I slept poorly last night, so I am feeling logy and slow this morning." About Logy Chronic fatigue, which could cause one to be logy and lethargic in everyday life, is actually a diagnosable medical condition. However, as much as 90% of cases of chronic fatigue go undiagnosed. Did you Know? No one is really sure about the origin of logy, but a common theory is that it stems from the Dutch word log ("heavy" or "dull").
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