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DarkRavie

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About DarkRavie

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  • Birthday March 25

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  1. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - ACERBIC pronunciation: [ə-SIR-bik] Part of speech: adjective Origin: Latin, 19th century meaning: 1. Sharp or harshly critical in tone --- 2. Having a sour or bitter taste "Her professor’s acerbic criticisms made her regret taking the class." "The lemon juice gave an acerbic note to the pasta." About Acerbic The root of acerbic is the Latin adjective "acerbus," meaning harsh or unpleasant. The meaning has held true in English, with the adjective "acerbic" being applied to anything with a sharp, sarcastic, or cutting delivery. Did you Know? The original meaning of "acerbic" concerned a literal bitter taste but it has evolved to describe a more figurative harsh tone or expression. You could enjoy a sour flavor, but you’re not likely to enjoy a sourpuss with an acerbic nature.
  2. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - STINGRAYS Did you know... that with flat, wide bodies, stingrays may not look like fish, but they are? They can be found in tropical and subtropical waters, because they like it shallow and warm. They’re usually hidden on the seafloor. But each of the 60 species of stingrays are fascinating in their own way. Stingrays come in all shapes and sizes and are one of the most beautiful creatures in the sea, but let’s face it, they are a little bizarre looking! Rays and skates are flattened fish closely related to sharks. All belong to a group of fish called Elasmobranchs. These guys are pretty unique as they have no bones in their body – their skeleton is made up of flexible cartilage (the bendy stuff that your ears and nose are made from!). Although they look near identical, rays and skates are actually different. Stingrays are ovoviviparous, meaning the young are hatched from eggs that are held within the body, whereas skates are oviparous, meaning they lay eggs – these eggs are protected by a hard, rectangular case often called a “mermaid”s purse“! There are many different types of ray including stingrays, electric rays, butterfly rays, round rays, manta rays, guitarfish and sawfish. Stingrays use a super set of senses to search for food. Special gel-filled pits across the front of their face, (called Ampullae of Lorenzini), allow them to pick up electrical signals from other animals when they move – cool! Their eyes are on the topside of their body and their mouth and gills can be found underneath, so in the darker depths or murky rivers this electromagnetic sense is especially useful for searching for prey. Many stingrays like to live by themselves and only come together for breeding and migration. Some of the largest rays such as manta rays and cow nose rays never stop swimming and migrate in their thousands to feeding grounds each year. These large groups can reach up to 10,000 individuals and are known as a “fever“. Rays protect themselves with venomous spines or barbs in their tail. Skates rely on thorny projections on their backs and tails. Stingrays and skates feed on crustaceans, small fish, snails, clams, shrimp and other small creatures. In 2008, a female bluespotted ribbontail ray gave birth to a set of twins at The Deep aquarium in Hull – a European first! Stingrays” natural predators are sharks, seals, sea lions and other large fish. Electric rays are named for their ability to generate and discharge a strong electric current to stun prey and for defence from potential predators. Fossil records date stingrays back to the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago! Rays can vastly vary in size. The smallest ray is the short-nose electric ray which is approximately 10cm across and weighs about 400g. The oceanic manta ray is the largest ray reaching up to 7m in wing span and weighs 2,000kg. Sadly, numbers of stingray are in decline. Overfishing, habitat loss and climate change are the major threats to rays. They”re also hunted for their gill rakers (used for feeding) for use in Chinese medicine. At present, 539 species of ray assessed are under the IUCN Red List, and 107 are classified as threatened. The Deep is part of the European Breeding Programme for the bluespotted ribbontail ray and blue spot stingray, as well as the species monitoring programme for the honeycomb whiptail ray. This means they are helping to safeguard populations of these species and are leading the way in pioneering new husbandry techniques.
  3. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - EDEMA pronunciation: [ihd-EE-muh] Part of speech: noun Origin: Greek, 15th century meaning: 1. Swelling caused by excess fluid trapped in the body --- 2. Swelling in plants caused by an excess accumulation of water "Make an appointment to see your doctor if you have edema, because it can be a symptom of many diseases." "The heavy rainfall caused edema in his garden plants." About Edema Edema is not always a symptom of disease. If you’re on your feet all day, or you take a long flight, you’re likely to have swelling in your feet and ankles. While edema can occur during these normal activities, it could also be a warning sign, so make sure to see a doctor if it persists. Did you Know? Edema, or swelling due to excess fluid accumulation, can be found in both humans and plants. In humans, you’ll often find edema as a result of medications, pregnancy, or certain diseases. Edema isn’t always a sign of something drastically wrong, but it needs to be addressed. In addition to treating the underlying illness, your doctor may recommend medication to remove the excess fluid or a diet low in salt.
  4. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - TOY TRAIN SETS Did you know.... that toy trains are for kids of all ages? While real trains go back to the advent of the Industrial Revolution in the early 1800s, toy trains emerged later. Wooden and metal toys resembling trains were first made in Europe in the 1860s. By 1901, Lionel made its first electric train for use in store display windows. A number of famous manufacturers, including Lionel, American Flyer, Ives, Marx, Marklin, and LGB have made toy trains. Some of the most historic ones are on display in the National Toy Train Museum. These are commonly referred to as tinplate trains. "Tinplate" is a term applied to toy trains originally built of thin stamped metal, but more broadly it includes trains composed of plastic parts as well, their over-riding characteristic being that they were built for mass-market enjoyment rather than the precise scale that some of today's model railroad craftsmen build and enjoy. Model Railroader magazine began in 1934, and by the 1950s, seemingly every boy had a train set. Around then, there arose a differentiation between cheaper production trains for kids and much more detailed and accurate reproductions pursued by adult train collectors. Some reflect actual trains, while others display general themes. For some, the delight is in the joy of collecting and operating, while for others the focus is on absolute scaled accuracy. Today, many of the Baby Boomers have embraced toy train collecting and operating. They can be seen in basements, at Christmas exhibits, running in gardens, and in special displays. Many toy trains today feature the latest in authentic sound and electronic control features. Increasingly, toy trains use digital technology both onboard and at the control panels. This allows greater control, introduction of new features, and new challenges. In fact, wiring has always been a task requiring planning and skill when creating a train layout. Toy trains prices range from economical to very expensive. Some are repaired, restored, traded and sold, with careful standards applied to their condition and worth. The Train Collectors Association is the largest and oldest group of toy train enthusiasts in the world. Toy trains come in different sizes, reflecting different rail gauges and scale. Engineering entrepreneur Joshua Lionel Cowen designed his first electric train as a store window attraction around 1900. When customers asked to purchase the train instead of the product it advertised, Cowen founded the Lionel Manufacturing Company to meet demand. Lionel built its reputation on train sets noted for their authentic detail, smooth-operating three-rail tracks, and transformers that allowed kids to vary the speed of their trains. This control, along with rolling stock of coal cars, refrigerated cars, and box cars, gave boys an appealing real-world sense of commerce and success. Shrewd marketing made every boy think of Lionel trains each time Christmas came around. “Everybody is happy when it's a Lionel Train Christmas,” proclaimed one advertisement. Other ads highlighted father-son bonding. Lionel Trains, they proclaimed, “made a Boy feel like a Man and a Man feel like a Boy.” Lionel trains symbolized the ideal American childhood for more than a century, and in its heyday during the 1950s, Lionel accounted for two-thirds of all the toy trains sold in the United States. Though no longer so dominant in the playroom or around the Christmas tree, Lionel Trains remain a favorite with many.
  5. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - SONOROUS pronunciation: [SON-er-uhs] Part of speech: adjective Origin: Latin, early 17th century meaning: 1. Capable of producing or giving out a sound --- 2. Resonant and deep in sound "The highlight of the hike was the sonorous cave, which produced a ringing echo from the hiker’s shouts." "He was selected to give the opening speech thanks to his imposing, sonorous voice." About Sonorous "Sonorous" is an adjective applying to sound, usually of a full and imposing nature. It comes from the Latin word for sound, "sonor." Pull out this regal adjective when the tones need appropriate weight for the description. We’re talking ringing gongs, not bird chirps. Did you Know? Sonorous can be used to describe the quality of a sound — think ringing clock bells, or a booming, deep voice — but it can also be used to describe a specific phonetic sound. When there is no stressed syllable, there’s still distinctness between vowels and consonants. This is sonority, and certain vowels can have a sonorous quality.
  6. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - ROUGH COLLIES Did you know... that the Rough Collie is a long-coated dog breed of medium to large size that, in its original form, was a type of collie used and bred for herding sheep in Scotland? Originally used as herding dogs in Scotland and Northern England, the rough collie dog has a beautiful, multicolored coat of long, rough-textured fur that easily identifies this amazing breed. Well-known for their intelligence and ease of training, the most famous rough collie personality trait is devotion to their owner followed by their love for children. Those basic characteristics made the rough collie dog the perfect breed to star as Lassie, the beloved family TV show pup that always came to the rescue of her little boy, Timmy. A dog breed that's well-known for herding and protecting abilities, rough collie dogs are described as strong, loyal, affectionate, responsive, and fast. The rough-coated collie has a beautiful long coat that flows as he runs, and his head is a smooth and elegant wedge shape. Rough collies can do well in the country or the city, but they need companionship and daily runs or long walks. Although they are a little less active than border collies, rough collies do need at least forty-five to sixty minutes of outdoor activity every day. Surprisingly, once he is back inside, he is very calm and happy to sit and lounge with his owner. The rough collie breed includes two variations: the long-hair, true rough collie, and the shorter-haired, sometimes called smooth collie. Additionally, Shetland sheepdogs and border collies are completely different breeds and are not part of the rough collie breed, despite their similar coat markings and facial features. As part of the herding classification, the rough collie personality is known to most as smart, quick to learn, and very in tune to people. Collies respond well to consistent, reward-based training, and they tend to enjoy the attention that comes with performing, whether doing tricks or competing in agility, obedience or herding events. Many collies make great therapy dogs as well, due to their calmness indoors and medium height. Rough collies, like the one featured in Lassie, can at times be very vocal. When rough collie dogs are bored, their bark is a clear sign that they need attention. They also have a tendency to nip at peoples' heels in play, another indication of their herding background. It is important to train your rough collie to not nip, especially around children, as it may frighten little ones. Due to the rough collie's high intelligence level, he is easy to house train and learns tricks quickly. However, switch up training activities occasionally to prevent boredom. They are very smart, so you should get creative with their training! The rough collie is family-oriented and loves playing with children. When he is outside, he will run as hard as he can, but as soon as he enters the house he'll be happy to relax with the rest of the family. Although the rough collie loves to be active outside, he is not an outdoor-only dog, and he can thrive in a small home or apartment as long as he gets daily exercise. The rough collie is noted for his deep loyalty and nurturing personality, but he also has a fierce independent streak. Owners should try to work with his independent tendencies, rather than against them. Giving your rough collie some time to run around by himself in a fenced area each day may help. A rough collie makes a great companion dog for a single person, but he will bond with all family members, not just the one who feeds him. The rough collie breed is known to learn the individual characteristics and behaviors of each person in the household. Again, this is why dedicated training of your rough collie is absolutely crucial. Rough collies are intelligent, and they are always watching people and learning, so it is important to train them early and often. The ancestors of today's rough collie worked as herding dogs in the Scottish Highlands. As partners to sheep herders, not much had been recorded over time about this breed. However, Queen Victoria shifted public attention to the breed in the 1860s, and they quickly became a favored breed of the wealthy upper class. In the 1950s, the rough collie breed became better known as the all-American family dog thanks to "Lassie." Over the show's two-decade run, it became apparent how devoted and faithful the breed was as Lassie saved Timmy from the well and warned her family of danger each week. Although Hollywood sometimes exaggerates, the depiction of the rough collie as a loyal protector couldn't have been more right. Today the rough collie is ranked among the top 50 most popular dog breeds by the American Kennel Club and continues to be famous for his loyal, loving, and protective demeanor.
  7. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - VERVE pronunciation: [vurv] Part of speech: noun Origin: French, late 17th century mewaning: 1. An energetic style of a literary or artistic work or performance --- 2. A vigorous nature or liveliness "The new exhibit at the modern art museum was full of verve and genre-defying pieces." "The children loved their babysitter for her verve and playfulness." About Verve English borrowed "verve" from French, where it has an identical spelling and meaning — energy, spirit, animation. Feel free to employ a French accent when using this word. You’ll be correct either way. Did you Know? "Verve" is used today to describe the energy that gives life to an artistic performance, composition, or piece of writing. Any sort of creator has verve. But an old-fashioned usage of the word simply meant a special talent or ability. Your verve could be fixing a toilet or composing a symphony.
  8. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - DOUBLOONS Did you know... that the doubloon was a two-escudo or 32-real gold coin, weighing 6.867 grams in 1537, and 6.766 grams from 1728, of .917 fine gold? Doubloons were minted in Spain and the viceroyalties of New Spain, Peru, and Nueva Granada. The term was first used to describe the golden excelente either because of its value of two ducats or because of the double portrait of Ferdinand and Isabella. In the New World, Spanish gold coins were minted in one, two, four, and eight escudo denominations. The two-escudo piece was called a "pistole"; the large eight-escudo coin was called a "quadruple pistole" or, at first, a double doubloon. English colonists would come to call it the Spanish doubloon. After the War of 1812, doubloons were valued in Nova Scotia at the rate of £4 and became the dominant coin there. Doubloons marked "2 S" are equivalent to four dollars in US gold coins and were traded in that manner. Small 1/2-escudo coins (similar to a US $1 gold piece) have no value marked on them but were worth a Spanish milled dollar in trade. In Spain, doubloons were current up to the middle of the 19th century. Isabella II of Spain replaced an escudo-based coinage with decimal reales in 1859, and replaced the 6.77-gram doblón with a new heavier doblón worth 100 reales and weighing 8.3771 grams (0.268 troy ounces). The last Spanish doubloons (showing the denomination as 80 reales) were minted in 1849. After their independence, the former Spanish colonies of Mexico, Peru and Nueva Granada continued to mint doubloons.
  9. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - HUGGER-MUGGER pronunciation: [HUHG-er-MUHG-er] Part of speech: adjective Origin: Unknown, 16th century meaning: 1. Chaotic and disorganized --- 2. Conducted with a secret or clandestine nature "You could barely see the carpet in the hugger-mugger bedroom." "His motives were unclear, but the hugger-mugger requests were suspicious." About Hugger-mugger The origin of "hugger-mugger" is unknown, but there are guesses tying it to the Middle English word "mukre," meaning to hoard or conceal. It’s not an incredibly well-known word, but if you start incorporating it into your vocabulary to describe any kind of chaotic or secretive situation, it’s sure to catch on again. Did you Know? "Hugger-mugger" can be used as an adjective, such as the definitions given here. It can also be a noun, with similar definitions to the adjective. A situation would be a hugger-mugger, rather than being described as hugger-mugger. You can even use this rhyming word as a verb, when you are keeping something concealed.
  10. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - PAPER MONEY Did you know... that paper money is an invention of the Song Dynasty in China in the 11th century CE, nearly 20 centuries after the earliest known use of metal coins. While paper money was certainly easier to carry in large amounts, using paper money had its risks: counterfeiting and inflation. The earliest known form of money is also from China, a cast copper coin from the 11th century BCE, which was found in a Shang Dynasty tomb in China. Metal coins, whether made from copper, silver, gold, or other metals, have been used across the globe as units of trade and value. They have advantages—they are durable, difficult to counterfeit, and they hold intrinsic value. The big disadvantage? If you have very many of them, they get heavy. For a couple thousand years after the coins were buried in that Shang tomb, however, merchants, traders, and customers in China had to put up with carrying coins, or with bartering goods for other goods directly. Copper coins were designed with square holes in the middle so that they could be carried on a string. For large transactions, traders calculated the price as the number of coin strings. It was workable, but an unwieldy system at best. During the Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE), however, merchants began to leave those heavy strings of coins with a trustworthy agent, who would record how much money the merchant had on deposit on a piece of paper. The paper, a sort of promissory note, could then be traded for goods, and the seller could go to the agent and redeem the note for the strings of coins. With trade renewed along the Silk Road, this simplified cartage considerably. These privately-produced promissory notes were still not true paper currency, however. At the beginning of the Song Dynasty (960–1279 CE), the government licensed specific deposit shops where people could leave their coins and receive notes. In the 1100s, Song authorities decided to take direct control of this system, issuing the world's first proper, government-produced paper money. This money was called jiaozi. The Song established factories to print paper money with woodblocks, using six colors of ink. The factories were located in Chengdu, Hangzhou, Huizhou, and Anqi, and each used different fiber mixes in their paper to discourage counterfeiting. Early notes expired after three years, and could only be used in particular regions of the Song Empire. In 1265, the Song government introduced a truly national currency, printed to a single standard, usable across the empire, and backed by silver or gold. It was available in denominations between one and one hundred strings of coins. This currency lasted only nine years, however, because the Song Dynasty tottered, falling to the Mongols in 1279. The Mongol Yuan Dynasty, founded by Kublai Khan (1215–1294), issued its own form of paper currency called chao; the Mongols brought it to Persia where it was called djaou or djaw. The Mongols also showed it to Marco Polo (1254–1324) during his 17-year-long stay in Kublai Khan's court, where he was amazed by the idea of government-backed currency. However, the paper money was not backed by gold or silver. The short-lived Yuan Dynasty printed increasing amounts of the currency, leading to runaway inflation. This problem was unresolved when the dynasty collapsed in 1368. Although the succeeding Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) also began by printing unbacked paper money, it suspended the program in 1450. For much of the Ming era, silver was the currency of choice, including tons of Mexican and Peruvian ingots brought to China by Spanish traders. Only in the last two, desperate years of Ming rule did the government print paper money, as it attempted to fend off the rebel Li Zicheng and his army. China did not print paper money again until the 1890s when the Qing Dynasty began producing yuan.
  11. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - DIVINATION pronunciation: [div-ə-NAY-shun] Part of speech: noun Origin: Latin, 14th century meaning: 1. The practice of foretelling the future by supernatural means --- 2. An especially strong sense of intuition or perception "The fortune teller was known for her divination skills, using tea leaves and tarot cards." "His mother’s divination was so reliable that he always trusted her advice." About Divination Fortune telling is a form of divination. Practicers of divination claim to be able to predict the future by tapping into supernatural elements. Your grandmother may claim to have the second sight, you could play with a Ouija board, or you could go get your tarot cards read by a psychic — all forms of divination. Did you Know? Practices of divination can be found in almost every culture. Witches, shamans, fortune tellers, oracles, seers, and prophets claim to predict the future using rituals of divination. Whether you believe in their abilities to tap into the supernatural is up to you.
  12. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - TIME TRAVEL Did you know... that time travel — moving between different points in time — has been a popular topic for science fiction for decades? Franchises ranging from "Doctor Who" to "Star Trek" to "Back to the Future" have seen humans get in a vehicle of some sort and arrive in the past or future, ready to take on new adventures. Each come with their own time travel theories. The reality, however, is more muddled. Not all scientists believe that time travel is possible. Some even say that an attempt would be fatal to any human who chooses to undertake it. What is time? While most people think of time as a constant, physicist Albert Einstein showed that time is an illusion; it is relative — it can vary for different observers depending on your speed through space. To Einstein, time is the "fourth dimension." Space is described as a three-dimensional arena, which provides a traveler with coordinates — such as length, width and height —showing location. Time provides another coordinate — direction — although conventionally, it only moves forward. (Conversely, a new theory asserts that time is "real.") Einstein's theory of special relativity says that time slows down or speeds up depending on how fast you move relative to something else. Approaching the speed of light, a person inside a spaceship would age much slower than his twin at home. Also, under Einstein's theory of general relativity, gravity can bend time. Picture a four-dimensional fabric called space-time. When anything that has mass sits on that piece of fabric, it causes a dimple or a bending of space-time. The bending of space-time causes objects to move on a curved path and that curvature of space is what we know as gravity. Both the general and special relativity theories have been proven with GPS satellite technology that has very accurate timepieces on board. The effects of gravity, as well as the satellites' increased speed above the Earth relative to observers on the ground, make the unadjusted clocks gain 38 microseconds a day. (Engineers make calibrations to account for the difference.) In a sense, this effect, called time dilation, means astronauts are time travelers, as they return to Earth very, very slightly younger than their identical twins that remain on the planet. General relativity also provides scenarios that could allow travelers to go back in time, according to NASA. The equations, however, might be difficult to physically achieve. One possibility could be to go faster than light, which travels at 186,282 miles per second (299,792 kilometers per second) in a vacuum. Einstein's equations, though, show that an object at the speed of light would have both infinite mass and a length of 0. This appears to be physically impossible, although some scientists have extended his equations and said it might be done. A linked possibility, NASA stated, would be to create "wormholes" between points in space-time. While Einstein's equations provide for them, they would collapse very quickly and would only be suitable for very small particles. Also, scientists haven't actually observed these wormholes yet. Also, the technology needed to create a wormhole is far beyond anything we have today. Want to read more about Time Travel? Click here.
  13. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - APERTURE pronunciation: [APP-er-cher] Part of speech: noun Origin: Latin, 15th century meaning: 1. An opening or hole --- 2. In photography, the opening in a lens that admits light into a camera "The aperture of the cave was so small he had to crawl on his stomach to enter." "Learning about aperture and its relationship to lighting is one of the basics of photography." About Aperture With the ease of digital photography, you don’t have to be an expert to take some good shots, but you’ll greatly improve your artistic abilities if you learn the basics of camera technology. Aperture is the opening in the lens that lets in light and thus affects every photograph you take, digital or manual. Depending on the size of your aperture, the light will change the appearance of your photograph. Did you Know? Aperture can be used to describe any type of opening, but it is most recognizable in relation to photography. We could get into a detailed and technical explanation of light, shutter speed, and focal points, but you can take a class for that. Just remember this: a large aperture will yield a shallow depth of field, while a small aperture will result in a wide depth of field.
  14. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - DISTILLATION Did you know... that distillation is a way to separate mixed liquids by utilizing the different boiling points of the liquids. We can distill a mixture by heating it to a temperature which lies between the boiling points of the two liquids. The liquid with the lower boiling point here evaporates; while the other liquid remains in liquid form in the flask. When the first liquid is in gaseous form, it is transferred to another container where it cools down and condenses. Thus it goes from gas phase back to the liquid phase. The result is two containers -with the two liquids that are now separated from each other. Distillation of alcohol We are now looking at a concrete example where we want to distill a mixture of water and ethanol. Ethanol is an alcohol with a boiling point of 78.4 ° C and water boils at 100 ° C. It is therefore necessary to heat this mixture to a minimum of 78.4 ° C, but the temperature must not exceed 100 ° C. Basically, it is a good idea to choose a temperature that is just above the boiling point of ethanol – for example 80 ° C. When the mixture is heated to about 80 ° C (either using a hotplate or a bunsen burner), the ethanol will begin to evaporate and this gas will move through the distillation head and into the cooler. The cooler is equipped with water that transforms the gas back to the liquid phase. The liquid then condenses on the glass in the cooler and then drops into a beaker that collects the distillate which is the ethanol. As the temperature of the mixture is not higher 100 ° C, the water remains in liquid form. However, it should be remembered that water at 80 ° C-90 ° C can also evaporate to a lesser extent, thus diluting the distilled ethanol. One can get a cleaner product by distilling the distillate of the first distillation. Distillation of crude oil Distillation is mainly used in refining crude oil on the so-called oil refineries. Here, however, the principle is typically extended to fractional distillation. In this type of distillation, crude oil is first distilled at about 400 ° C, and that which does not evaporate, is sorted off and used for, for example, asphalt. After that, a new distillation is made on the rest of the crude oil, and in that way it is possible to separate the different ingredients of the crude one by one by repeated distillations, lowering the temperature for each distillation. This gives the pure products such as diesel, petroleum, butane and propane. In practice, after the fractional distillation, a large number of refining processes of the individual products will take place before the finished products are obtained.
  15. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - MONOCULTURE pronunciation: [MON-ə-cull-cher] Part of speech: noun Origin: French, early 20th century meaning: 1. The practice of growing a single crop at a time --- 2. A single crop grown in an area "Corn is such a valuable commodity that many farmers practice monoculture of the crop." "The swampland was overgrown with the monoculture, and no other crops could thrive." About Monoculture Mono = single. Practicing monoculture means growing only one plant, so a farmer who is against this will grow a wide variety of crops. Farming has become big business, with large farms growing single crops dominating the agricultural world. But your backyard garden, with a mixture of anything you feel like growing, is a perfect example of polyculture, or the cultivation of many different crops. Did you Know? Today, you’re probably feasting on a cornucopia of Thanksgiving classics, like potatoes or green beans, but this agricultural term hones in on just one. “Monoculture” can be applied to both the practice of growing a single crop and the name of the crop itself. Monoculture has allowed farmers to increase their efficiency by specializing in one crop — say, those yams you devoured at the dinner table. Polyculture is the practice of growing many crops, and oligoculture rotates between just a few.
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