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  1. 1 point
    http://www.epicgames.com/store/en-US/product/20xx/home 20XX is currently free on Epic Game Store. http://www.epicgames.com/store/en-US/product/barony/home Barony is currently free on Epic Game Store. https://www.epicgames.com/store/en-US/product/superbrothers-sword-and-sworcery-ep Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP is currently free on Epic Game Store. https://store.steampowered.com/app/616700/Rage_of_Car_Force_Car_Crashing_Games/ Rage of Car Force: Car Crashing Games is free to play on Steam. https://store.steampowered.com/app/1368340/Beneath_a_Steel_Sky/ Beneath a Steel Sky is now free on Steam. It has always been free on GOG.
  2. 1 point
    Fact of the Day - RICHARD PRYOR Pryor in February 1986 Did you know... that Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor was an American stand-up comedian, actor, and writer. He reached a broad audience with his trenchant observations and storytelling style, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential stand-up comedians of all time. (Wikipedia) Richard Pryor, in full Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III, (born December 1, 1940, Peoria, Illinois, U.S.—died December 10, 2005, Los Angeles, California), American comedian and actor, who was one of the leading comics of the 1970s and ’80s. His comedy routines drew on a variety of downtrodden urban characters, rendered with brutal emotional honesty. Pryor, an African American, began working in clubs in the early 1960s, developing his brand of controversial, race-based humour. His success influenced many later comics. He appeared in motion pictures such as Lady Sings the Blues (1972) and Silver Streak (1976), becoming a major box-office attraction. He also had success with his own concert films, including Richard Pryor: Live on the Sunset Strip (1982). In 1986 he starred in the autobiographical Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling. His stand-up performances also were documented in comedy albums, for which he won five Grammy Awards. As a comedy writer, Pryor received an Emmy for the Lily Tomlin television special Lily (1973) and a Writers Guild Award as co-writer of the screenplay for Blazing Saddles (1974). Left: Alan Alda, center: Lily Tomlin, Right: Richard Pryor in the Lily Tomlin Special, Lily. Pryor struggled with drug problems, and in 1980 he was seriously burned in what was reported as a cocaine-related incident. Diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1986, he made few appearances after the early 1990s. Pryor was presented with the Kennedy Center’s Mark Twain Prize in 1998. His autobiography, Pryor Convictions and Other Life Sentences (co-written with Todd Gold), was published in 1995. Pryor is considered by many to be the greatest stand-up comedian of all time. Jerry Seinfeld referred to him as “the Picasso of our profession.” Chris Rock has called him comedy’s Rosa Parks. Yet the indelible mark Pryor made on the world of comedy only tells part of his story. Like his career in the spotlight, Pryor’s world offstage was also highly compelling and full of shocking turns. He’s one of those people whose real life was so off-the-wall at times that it becomes tough to separate fact from fiction. Here are just a few stories about the brilliant and chaotic life of the great Richard Pryor. RICHARD PRYOR HAD A TRAGIC CHILDHOOD. Richard Pryor had a tragic early life, experiencing things that no child should have to endure: Born to a prostitute named Gertrude on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois, Pryor’s father was a former boxer and hustler named LeRoy Pryor. For much of his childhood, Pryor was raised in the actual brothel where his mother worked, which was owned by his own no-nonsense grandmother, Marie Carter. With his mother periodically dropping out of his life for long stretches, it was Marie who served as Pryor’s central guardian and caretaker. In 2015, The New Yorker published an article to mark the 10th anniversary of Pryor’s passing, which offered further details on his turbulent early life, noting: Pryor said that one of the reasons he adored movies as a boy was that you were never in doubt as to why the women in them were screaming. As for the sounds that Richard heard in the middle of the night in his room on the top floor of one of Marie’s businesses, he had no idea what was happening to those girls. A number of times, he saw his mother, Gertrude, one of the women in Marie’s employ, nearly beaten to death by his father. Gertrude left when Richard was five. He later registered no resentment over this. “At least Gertrude didn’t flush me down the toilet,” he said. (This was not a joke. As a child, Pryor opened a shoebox and found a dead baby inside.) RICHARD PRYOR WALKED AWAY FROM A SUCCESSFUL CAREER. Early in his career Pryor found success by modeling his comedy largely on the work on Bill Cosby, which led to many comparisons being drawn between the two—a fact that Cosby reportedly grew to dislike. There are conflicting tales of just how Pryor made the 180-degree change in style that led to him becoming a comedic legend. One of the most well traveled tales, and one that Pryor himself confirmed on more than one occasion, states that Pryor was performing his clean-cut act in Las Vegas one night when he looked out into the audience and saw Dean Martin among the crowd. If you believe the story, seeing the legendarily cool Rat Packer’s face made Pryor question what exactly he was doing and caused him to abruptly leave the stage mid-performance. Around this time Pryor moved to the San Francisco Bay area, dropped out of the comedy limelight for several years, and later reemerged with the more pointed, in-your-face style that made him an icon. RICHARD PRYOR MADE LORNE MICHAELS QUIT SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE. Back in 1975, Saturday Night Live was brand new, so at the time the show’s creator, Lorne Michaels, wasn’t yet a powerful TV icon. Therefore, when Michaels stuck his neck out and demanded the right to have Pryor on as a guest host, he was really risking a lot. It took Michaels handing in a fake resignation to convince NBC executives to allow the famously foulmouthed comic to appear. Michaels himself had to implement a secret five-second delay for that night’s episode to be sure that any off-the-cuff, unscripted choice language didn’t make its way out over the airwaves. The delay was kept from Pryor who, upon later finding out, confirmed that he would have refused to do the show had he known about it The episode, the seventh one of SNL’s premiere season, contained one of the most memorable and edgy sketches ever to appear on the show: (the NSFW) Word Association. Chevy Chase and Pryor’s personal writer, Paul Mooney, have each claimed to have written the sketch. RICHARD PRYOR LOST THE STARRING ROLE IN BLAZING SADDLES. Pryor and Gene Wilder made four films together (Silver Streak; Stir Crazy; See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and Another You), but there could have been at least one more. Pryor was one of the credited writers on Mel Brooks’s classic Blazing Saddles and the plan for a time was that he would also co-star in the film, playing Sheriff Bart alongside Wilder as the Waco Kid. In the clip above, Wilder explained how Pryor’s infamous drug use caused him to end up in a remote city and subsequently lose the starring role to Cleavon Little. Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder Source: Encyclopaedia Britannica - Richard Pryor | Wikipedia - Richard Pryor Click below to read more on Richard Pryor. Source: MentalFloss - Richard Pryor
  3. 1 point
    What's the Word? - TERMINUS pronunciation: [tər-mən-əs] Part of speech: noun Origin: Latin, mid-16th century Meaning: 1. A final point in space or time; an end or extremity. 2. The end of a railroad or other transportation route, or a station at such a point; a terminal. Example: "The terminus of the highway construction is scheduled for April 2021." "Take the subway to the terminus, and I'll meet you there." About Terminus You might recognize the adjective "terminal," meaning situated at the end, but "terminus" is the noun form. Use this word to distinguish the end point, either in space or time. It's a handy word to pull out at the end of a party. "This is the terminus, and you don't have to go home, but you can't stay here." Did you know? Terminus is also used as a name for a specific architectural feature. A terminus is a figure of a human bust or an animal ending in a square pillar from which it appears to spring, originally used as a boundary marker in ancient Rome.
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