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  1. Today
  2. CardGames

    Official Coronavirus/COVID-19 Thread

    I don't know if this has happened in other states, however, in my home state (Ohio) when the stay at home order was extended until pretty much May... they also issued an order to limit the amount of people that can be in a 'grocery story' at one time. Because... you know... that can be enforced.
  3. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - FANDANGLE pronunciation: [fan-DAYN-ɡəl] Part of speech: noun Origin: Unknown 19th century meaning: 1. A useless or purely ornamental thing. Example: "I couldn’t resist buying the little fandangle at the beachside souvenir store." "Her wedding dress was covered in bows and lace and fandangles." About Fandangle There’s not much use for this object, but it sure is pretty. Maybe you have a cabinet full of knick-knacks, or your bed is covered with ornamental pillows. Anything with purely decorative potential, but no real use — that’s a fandangle. Did you know? Fandangle can’t be traced back to a specific root language, but it’s safe to assume it’s related to fandango. This is the name for a lively Spanish dance accompanied by a tambourine, or the name for an elaborate process or activity. Fandangle came about in the 19th century, likely as an alteration of the second definition of fandango.
  4. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - CHERRY BLOSSOMS (PINK BLOSSOMS Spring Tree Blossom Flowers Art" by Baslee Troutman Fine Art Prints) Did you know.... that A cherry blossom is a flower of many trees of genus Prunus? The most well-known species is the Japanese cherry, Prunus serrulata, which is commonly called sakura. (Wikipedia) 1. YOU'LL ONLY FIND CHERRY BLOSSOMS IN A HANDFUL OF COUNTRIES. ("Cherry Blossom Avenue" in Bonn, Germany) Called sakura in Japan, the cherry blossoms of Yoshino and Kyoto are world-famous. Tourists flock to the country each spring to try their hand at a centuries-old activity called hanami, or “flower viewing.” You don’t have to fly to Japan to see them, though. In the U.S., the cherry blossoms of Washington, D.C., New York City, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Seattle, San Francisco, and Boston are all beautiful in their own way. The flowers can also be viewed in many European and Asian countries, as well as Brazil and Australia in the southern hemisphere. 2. THE CHERRY BLOSSOM CAPITAL OF THE WORLD IS IN THE STATE OF GEORGIA. Believe it or not, the city of Macon in central Georgia is recognized as the “Cherry Blossom Capital of the World”—at least according to U.S. Congressional records. It’s home to 350,000 Yoshino cherry trees, while Washington, D.C. has fewer than 4000 trees. Those who organize the two cities’ respective cherry blossom festivals have engaged in some playful competition over the years. In 1987, representatives of the Macon festival sent army helmets to TV stations in D.C. “to dramatize the rivalry,” according to an article published at the time in The Record. Representatives in D.C. played it cool, with one spokesperson for the National Park Service stating, “I’m sure they have much more than we have here, but we’re still proud of our celebration.” 3. THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF CHERRY TREE VARIETIES. (The blossoms of a Kanzan tree) Japan in particular is home to hundreds of types of cherry tree—possibly more than 600, by more liberal estimates. Some types bear fruit, while others don’t. The flowers of many trees change from dark pink to light pink to white throughout the different stages of blossoming, while others progress from greenish yellow to white to pink. One variety, called Kanzan, was bred to have “double blossoms”—or up to 28 petals on each flower, compared to the Yoshino tree’s five petals. 4. THEY DON'T BLOOM FOR LONG. A cherry tree might only remain in bloom for one to two weeks. However, they only keep up their “peak color” for about three days, so it’s best to time your trip wisely if you’re visiting a cherry blossom destination from out of town. The timing depends on a number of factors, including location, heat, and daylight. In D.C., the florets typically start to appear in March, and peak bloom (when 70 percent of the flowers have blossomed) generally occurs in late March or early April. This year, the National Park Service predicts that peak bloom will occur from April 3 to April 6, 2019. 5. CLIMATE CHANGE COULD BE MAKING THEM BLOSSOM EARLIER. The projected peak bloom dates are right on track for 2019, but that hasn’t always been the case. Some scholars have suggested that the trees are blooming earlier and earlier as the planet gradually gets warmer. Dr. Soo-Hyung Kim, an ecophysiologist at the University of Washington who has studied the phenomenon, says that by 2080 we could expect to see cherry blossoms in D.C. as early as February. 6. YOU CAN GET ARRESTED FOR PLUCKING A CHERRY BLOSSOM IN WASHINGTON, D.C. (ISTOCK.COM/ROBERTDODGE) Resist the urge to take a cherry blossom home with you as a souvenir. In D.C. at least, breaking off a blossom or branch is viewed as vandalism of federal property. Those who break this rule could receive a citation, or worse, be arrested. (Though usually, law enforcement officers prefer to issue warnings or small fines.) It goes without saying that it’s also illegal to climb the trees. If they sustain damage to their branches, they will never be able to grow new blossoms on that particular bough again. 7. THE VERY FIRST CHERRY TREES TO ARRIVE IN AMERICA WERE A COMPLETE DISASTER. In 1909, Japan offered to send 2000 cherry trees to America as a symbol of friendship between the two countries. After all, just a few years earlier, U.S. President Teddy Roosevelt had helped Japan negotiate an end to the Russo-Japanese War. Despite the good intentions, the execution was disastrous. When the trees arrived in D.C. in January 1910, the trees were weak—due to over-pruning of their roots—and they were also infested with wood-boring insects. Despite attempts to save them, the trees were ultimately thrown in a pile and burned. Everyone was pretty embarrassed about the whole ordeal, but Tokyo mayor Yukio Ozaki made a joke to ease some of the tension. “To be honest about it, it has been an American tradition to destroy cherry trees ever since your first president, George Washington,” he said. “So there’s nothing to worry about. In fact, you should be feeling proud.” (Washington's cherry tree story turned out to be untrue, but we digress.) Another shipment of trees was sent, and by 1912, the healthy trees were successfully planted in D.C. by then-First Lady Helen Taft. 8. THE CHERRY TREES IN ONE DUTCH MUNICIPALITY HAVE PROPER NAMES. Located in the largest park in the Netherlands, all 400 cherry blossom trees have proper names. Half of them have traditional Dutch women’s names, and the other half have Japanese women’s names. The Japan Women’s Club gifted the trees in 2000, and you can now find them at Amsterdamse Bos (Amsterdam Forest) in the Amstelveen municipality. 9. BOTH THE BLOSSOMS AND LEAVES ARE EDIBLE. (JAPAN CRATE) In Japan, no part of the cherry blossom tree goes to waste. The preserved leaves are used as edible mochi wrappers (a rice cake filled with sweet bean paste), and a number of seasonal snacks feature sakura as a key ingredient. Sakura-infused versions of Pepsi, Coke, tea, and even Starbucks lattes are all popular drinks. You can also find two varieties of Kit Kats—sakura and roasted soy bean, and sakura sake—as well as Pocky snack sticks that taste like sakura and matcha (green tea). So what do cherry blossoms taste like? They have a “light, flowery, slightly cherry flavor,” according to Gabe Perez, social media director at Japan Crate, a subscription box service that ships many of the aforementioned snacks, plus other Japanese products, to customers. 10. THEY WERE THE INSPIRATION BEHIND A RECORD-SETTING LEGO SCULPTURE. LEGOLAND Japan, a theme park in Nagoya, set a Guinness World Record in 2018 for the largest LEGO brick cherry blossom tree ever made (although we’re not sure how much competition they had). The tree stood 14 feet tall, weighed over 7000 pounds, and consisted of more than 800,000 LEGO bricks. Source: Emily Petsko
  5. Does anyone have [Fidelbd] Naruto Shippuden boxset encode please DM me

  6. GlassReality45

    Disney/Pixar Soul (2020)

    This seems really interesting. I always like Disney's animated features and I'm excited to see how this one turns out, it seems like a nicely original concept.
  7. Yesterday
  8. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - AGGLOMERATE pronunciation: [ə-GLAHM-ər-ate] Part of speech: VERB Origin: Latin, late 17th century meaning: 1. Collect or form into a mass or group. Example: "The students agglomerated at the football field for the rally." "If you can agglomerate the laundry into one pile, it will be easier to manage." About Agglomerate In Latin, “glomus” is a ball. From that we get the verb “agglomerate,” which roughly means added to a ball. In English, agglomerate is mainly used in a more technical sense for gathering up something into a group. Did you know? Agglomerate is one of those special words that can be used as a verb, a noun, and an adjective. You can agglomerate a mound of spilled cereal; an agglomerate of cereal can be in a bowl, and an agglomerate pile of cereal on the floor just looks messy.
  9. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - THOMAS EDISON Did you know... that Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman who has been described as America's greatest inventor? He developed many devices in fields such as electric power generation, mass communication, sound recording, and motion pictures. (Wikipedia) Thomas Edison applied for his first patent in 1868, when he was just 21 years old. The famous inventors' first brainchild was for a device that recorded legislative votes. That was just the start of a career in which he would obtain 1,093 U.S. patents, in addition to another 500 to 600 applications that he either didn’t finish or were rejected. But Edison’s greatest invention may have been developing a new process for coming up with inventions. (Vote Recorder) “When Edison raised enormous capital, built a laboratory in Menlo Park, N.J., and hired a staff of several dozen, each with distinct talents, he pioneered what became the modern corporate research and development process,” explains Ernest Freeberg, a historian at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and author of The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America. “He considered it an invention factory, one that would produce surprising new products at a regular rate.” In many cases, Edison’s genius was taking a new technology that someone else had pioneered and developing a superior way of doing the same thing. “An invention not only has to work fairly well, but it has to be something that the market wants and can afford to buy. Edison understood that as well as anyone in his day,” says Freeberg. Below are some of Edison’s most significant inventions. Automatic Telegraph Thomas Edison pictured operating a telegraph machine. While Samuel Morse’s invention of the telegraph in the 1830s and 1840s made it possible for the first time to communicate over long distances, the device had its drawbacks. An operator had to listen to incoming dots and dashes in Morse code, which slowed messages to a speed of 25 to 40 words per minute. A British system for automatically printing code in ink on paper only achieved 120 words tops. Between 1870 and 1874, Edison developed a vastly superior system, in which a telegraph receiver utilized a metal stylus to mark chemically-treated paper, which then could be run through a typewriter-like device. It was capable of recording up to 1,000 words a minute, which made it possible to send long messages quickly. (Automatic Telegraphy) Carbon Telephone Transmitter Cross-section of Edison's lamp-black button telephone transmitter. It was Alexander Graham Bell who patented the telephone in 1876. But Edison, with his knack for building upon others’ innovations, found a way to improve Bell’s transmitter, which was limited in how far apart phones could be by weak electrical current. Edison got the idea of using a battery to provide current on the phone line and to control its strength by using carbon to vary the resistance. To do that, he designed a transmitter in which a small piece of lampblack (a black carbon made from soot) was placed behind the diaphragm. When someone spoke into the phone, the sound waves moved the diaphragm, and the pressure on the lampblack changed. Edison later replaced the lampblack with granules made from coal—a basic design that was used until the 1980s. The Light Bulb Edison's filament lamp, with a glass bulb containing a partial vacuum. Contrary to popular belief, Edison didn’t actually invent the incandescent light bulb. But he invented and marketed a design that was the first to be long-lasting enough to be practical for widespread use. “Edison was one of a half dozen who were putting the elements of a viable lighting system together in those years, and since Edison was late to the race, he benefited from all his predecessors and rivals,” Freeberg explains. In the late 1870s, Edison designed a vacuum bulb, in which a metal filament could be heated to create light. One night, after absentmindedly rolling between his fingers a piece of lampblack, the material he used in his telephone receiver, he got the idea for switching to a carbonized filament. After initially using carbonized cardboard, he began experimenting with other materials, and eventually settled upon bamboo, which possessed long fibers that made it more durable. Eventually, the combination of bamboo filaments and an improved vacuum pump that removed air more effectively enabled Edison to increase the lifetime of bulbs to approximately 1,200 hours. Phonograph Thomas Edison pictured with his phonograph. While developing his telephone transmitter, Edison got the idea of creating a machine that could record and playback telephone messages. That notion led him to imagine being able to record not just voices, but music and other sounds, by using sound to vibrate a diaphragm and push a stylus that made indentations on a cylinder covered with wax paper that was being turned by a crank. In late 1877, he got a machinist to build the device, using tin foil instead of wax, and Edison recorded the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” The following year, he was granted a patent for the design, which also included a lighter needle to find the groves and transmit vibrations to a second diaphragm, which recreated the person’s voice. Edison’s phonograph created a sensation and helped enhance his reputation as a great inventor. Eventually, he began to market and sell the machines and cylinder records, reverting again to using wax. But by the early 1900s, the Victor Talking Machine Company’s phonographs that played discs surpassed Edison’s cylinder phonographs in popularity. Even though cylinders produced better-quality sound, the early discs had a big advantage in that they could fit four minutes of music, compared to the two minutes that could fit on a cylinder. Movie Camera and Viewer A Kinetograph camera, 1912. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images) In the late 1880s, Edison supervised his lab’s development of a technology “that does for the eye what the phonograph does for the ear.” Most of the work on the Kinetograph, an early movie camera, and the Kinetoscope, a single-person peephole movie viewer, was actually performed by Edison’s employee William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson. Movies became a big industry and Edison’s camera and viewer were quickly replaced by innovations such as the Lumière Cinématographe, a combination camera, printer and projector that allowed audiences to watch a film together. But Edison adjusted and his company became a thriving early movie studio, churning out scores of silent films between the 1890s and 1918, when it shut down production. Lumière cinématographe (body no 254), c.1895 Alkaline Storage Battery (Edison Battery – 1903) When the automobile was developed in the late 1800s, electric vehicles were more popular than those equipped with gasoline-burning internal combustion engines. But early electric cars had a big drawback—the batteries they used were heavy and tended to leak acid, which corroded the cars’ interiors. Edison decided to take on the challenge of inventing a lighter, more dependable and more powerful battery. After conducting extensive research and the embarrassing flop of an early design, Edison came up with a reliable alkaline battery, and in 1910 began production of it. His work, however, was soon overshadowed by Henry Ford’s development of the inexpensive Model T car that ran on an internal combustion engine. Nevertheless, Edison’s storage battery was used in mining lamps, trains and submarines and turned into the most successful product of Edison’s later career. Storage Battery (Edison's storage battery) During the first decade of the twentieth century, Edison spent much of his time developing a storage battery that he intended for use in electric automobiles. Edison had a long-standing interest in battery design dating back to his time as a telegraph inventor. He was among the first to try to design consumer-friendly primary batteries in connection with his electric pen copying system and his electric phonograph, but he was never able to overcome the problems presented by the need to replenish chemicals and electrodes in wet cells. Edison did make important improvements in primary battery design, notably for the Edison-Lalande cell, which was used for a variety of purposes. Edison also investigated storage batteries in the early 1880s in connection with central stations but decided that they were not efficient for that purpose. However, the advent of automobiles in the late 1890s spurred him to develop a storage battery to power them. Aware of the weight problems with lead acid batteries, Edison decided to experiment with alkaline electrolytes, such as those used in the Edison-Lalande cell in order to develop a lightweight and long-lasting battery. However, it took him a decade to develop a commercially viable iron-nickel battery and by that time automobiles powered by internal combustion engines had become dominant. Edison did find an extensive market for his battery in a variety of industrial uses, and it was the most successful product of his later life. Source: History Stories
  10. PhantomKnight

    What Games Are You Currently Playing?

    Playing Persona 5 Royal and Luigi's Mansion 3
  11. PhantomKnight

    Recent Gaming Purchases?

    Just got Journey to the savage planet, Persona 5 Royal and Fire Emblem Three Houses
  12. Last week
  13. CardGames

    Anime You've Recently Completed?

    Sword Art Online Alicization War of Underworld S1 finished airing on Toonami last night. It's unknown when S2 will air because it hasn't even started airing in Japan yet I think. It's also unknown what, if anything, will replace it on Toonami. Most likely, once again, due to COVID situation. Next week is a ridiculous DBZ Kai marathon. As for the season itself... pretty decent overall.
  14. Koby

    Final Fantasy VII Remake - Thoughts?

    So turns out Square-Enix royally fucked FF7 "remake" and turned it into a FF7 "fan-fiction". HUGE spoilers
  15. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - COLLOGUE pronunciation: [kə-LOWG] Part of speech: VERB Origin: Latin, early 17th century meaning: 1. Talk confidentially or conspiratorially. 2. (obsolete) Flatter, pretend to agree with or believe. Example: "When you’re alone, I need to collogue with you." "The siblings collogued after dinner to discuss their mother’s surprise birthday party." About Collogue If you have a secret plan, you might collogue with your conspirators. To collogue means to speak confidentially. In the past there was another usage for flattering speech, but that got pushed out in favor of sharing secrets. Did you know? Not much is known about the etymology of collogue, but it’s safe to assume there is a tie to the Latin word “colloqui,” meaning to converse. If you’re attending an academic conference, it might be called a colloquium, but you can also find similar gatherings called collogues.
  16. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - THE VICTORIAN ERA (Queen Victoria) Did you know.. that the Victorians were the people who lived during the reign of Queen Victoria, from the 20 June 1837 until the date of her death on the 22 January 1901? It is remembered as a time of exciting discoveries, inventions and exploration following the Industrial Revolution. During the Victorian era, Britain expanded its territory throughout the world and became the largest, richest and most powerful empire in world history! A quarter of the world’s population lived in the empire. Queen Victoria was even crowned Empress of India! Today, we look back at empire differently to how it was viewed at the time. Native people were often treated unfairly by the invading British and tensions ran high. Over time, the empire broke down and gradually, countries gained independence. New inventions, like the telephone, motorcar, typewriter, bicycle and moving film totally changed the way that people lived, worked and travelled. In 1856, an engineer named Henry Bessemer invented a new method for turning iron into steel making it possible to build ships, bridges and other structures on a scale like never before! A photograph of the locomotive named the ‘Iron Duke’, with two engineers on board. Expansion of the railways meant that people could travel faster and further than ever before. All of Britain’s major cities, like London, Glasgow and Manchester, were now connected. Before trains, the fastest mode of transport was horses. All aboard! The boom in industry saw lots of people moving to cities to find work. For the first time in world history, more people lived in cities than in the countryside, making city centres very cramped! Poor people lived in crowded slums — houses which were overcrowded, smelly and in bad repair. London Slums Despite Britain’s political power, many ordinary people lead hard lives. As technology advanced, new machines left lots of people without jobs. Many resorted to workhouses, which provided basic poor relief like food, medical care and shelter in exchange for labour. Conditions were poor and sadly, families were often separated. A day in the life of the Victorian workhouse: 1881 Many charities for the poor, like the Salvation Army and Barnardo’s, were established during the Victorian era. They fed the hungry in soup kitchens, and looked after the poorest children in orphanages. The Salvation Army Victorian children were expected to work long hours and for less money than adults. Seems unfair, right?! To make matters worse, the jobs were often dangerous and conditions were hard. Children were favoured because they could fit into tight spaces that adults couldn’t. Therefore, many children worked in factories, coal mines and as chimney sweeps. Before the Victorian era, most of Britain’s population couldn’t read or write and had limited access to education. Queen Victoria believed that education should be for all, and by the end of her reign, going to school became compulsory for all children, rich or poor. In early workhouse schools, money for basic supplies such as chalk and slate could be limited. Some Guardians even questioned whether pauper children actually needed to learn to read and write. However this workhouse classroom from early 1900 probably looks much like any other school at the time. Improvements in education meant that more people could enjoy reading. Children’s books were no longer just for learning, they were fun! New titles such as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Treasure Island and The Jungle Book became hugely popular. Victorian children loved an adventure story! This period was a great time for the arts, too! Some of Britain’s best-known poets, thinkers and authors flourished in the Victorian era, like poet Elizabeth Browning, playwright Oscar Wilde and authors Emily Brontë and Charles Dickens. Dickens’ novels – such as Oliver Twist – often focused on poor people, and his stories helped to highlight their plight. The Bank Holidays Act of 1871 introduced extra days off throughout the year. Banks and offices would close and people could take time off work. The first travel agent, a businessman named Thomas Cook, ran trips to the seaside, which were very popular amongst Victorian families — those who could afford it, that is! Thomas Cook brochure- 1901 Holiday brochures became very visual in the early Victorian era Organised sport became popular in the Victorian era. In 1871, the first Rugby Football Union was set up. It is believed that the sport was invented when William Webb Ellis, a pupil at Rugby School in England, picked up the ball during a game of football and ran with it! Believe it or not, television didn’t exist in Victorian times! Therefore, Victorians entertained themselves by going to the theatre or watching live music. Visiting the music hall was a popular British pastime for poorer people. For a penny, customers were treated to a variety show, showcasing musicians, comedians and plays. Healthcare saw huge improvements under the Victorians. Medical pioneers like Florence Nightingale worked with the government to improve hospital cleanliness — which hadn’t been considered as important before! ‘Lady of the Lamp’ aka Florence Nightingale! Source: National Geographic Kids
  17. Xykan

    Free Games Megathread

    The DLC for Region of Ruin is also free. https://store.steampowered.com/app/843800/Regions_of_RuinSieges/
  18. Antigonius

    Anti rambles about...

    Anti continues the interseasonals with a ramble about Maria Holic! Happy April, everyone!
  19. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - PORTAGE pronunciation: [POHR-dij] Part of speech: noun Origin: French, late 17th century meaning: 1. The carrying of a boat or its cargo between two navigable waters. 2. A place where carrying a boat is necessary. Example: "Our canoe trip required portage from the river into the larger lake." "The view of the waterfall from the portage was breathtaking." About Portage Portage as a noun is the act of carrying a boat between bodies of water, or the place where it is done. But it can also be used as a verb for this same activity: "We needed to portage to reach the lake." Did you know? Portage is a popular name for towns and other locations. There's Portage County, Wisconsin, Portage Park in Chicago, Portage, Indiana, and Portage Township in Michigan. It's especially popular in Alaska: Portage Lake, Portage Creek, Portage Glacier Highway, and the ghost town of Portage.
  20. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - The Kennel Club Did you know.... that the Kennel Club is the official kennel club of the United Kingdom. It is the oldest recognised kennel club in the world. Its role is to act as governing body for various canine activities including dog shows, dog agility and working trials? (Wikipedia) The Kennel Club was founded on 4th April 1873 by S.E. Shirley and twelve other gentlemen. They wanted to have a consistent set of rules for governing the popular new activities of dog showing and field trials. It was the first national Kennel Club in the world. The Kennel Club's first home was a three-room flat at 2 Albert Mansions, Victoria Street, London and since then, we have moved house ten times. The Victorian love of both dogs and hobbies meant that dog showing and activities became very popular in the 19th Century. The first conformation Dog Show was held in the Town Hall, Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1859 and the next 14 years saw explosive growth in this new and fashionable hobby. The first organised Field Trial took place at Southill in 1865 and this sport also gained a large following. Whilst Field Trials were very much for the country gent, Dog Shows were an urban activity, accessible to people of all classes and popular both with exhibitors and spectators. The founders of the Kennel Club wanted to ensure that all Dog Shows and Field Trials were run fairly and honestly and with the welfare of the dogs in mind so they set up the Kennel Club to govern these events nationwide. In 1874, the first Kennel Club Stud Book was published. It listed the results of all Dog Shows and Field Trials since 1859 and included sets of rules for running Dog Shows and Field Trials. A Kennel Club Stud Book has been published every year since and provides a record of results for all Championship Dog Shows, Field Trials and other dog activities, such as Obedience and Agility. Another important task for the newly-formed Kennel Club to undertake was to have a register of dogs so they could be identified properly. In 1880, the first monthly register of dog names was printed in the very first issue of the Kennel Gazette. These registration records ensured that each dog could be uniquely identified and, over the years, have provided the source of pedigree information for every dog on the Kennel Club's breed registers. Nowadays, over 200,000 dogs are registered with the Kennel Club each year. As well as ensuring that dog shows and other events were properly managed, the Kennel Club was also concerned with the health of dogs. Of the ten rules for running a dog show published in the very first Stud Book, two are concerned with health, stating that a veterinary inspector should be present at shows with over 200 entries and that dogs must be withdrawn from the show if they have any contagious disease. H.R.H The Prince of Wales (later H.M. Edward VII) was the Kennel Club's first patron and was a staunch supporter of the movement to prevent the cropping of dogs' ears. Since 1949, the Kennel Club has been investing in veterinary and scientific research projects to ensure the improved health and welfare of dogs. Modern health testing began to be developed in conjunction with the BVA in the 1960s and now the Kennel Club manages testing schemes and publishes test results for a whole range of inherited conditions. The Kennel Club Charitable Trust, founded in 1985, gives numerous donations to projects such as canine rescue and dogs for the disabled, and supports research into canine diseases. In 2004 the Kennel Club created an educational resource at the Animal Health Trust to aid education of breeders and owners on the genetic health of dogs. The Animal Health Trust now hosts the Kennel Club Genetics Centre and the Kennel Club Cancer Centre. As dog showing became more and more popular, the Kennel Club needed to ensure that the number of shows held was kept under control and that high standards could be maintained. So, in 1900 a system of show licences was developed with each show management undertaking a guarantee to hold the show under strict Kennel Club rules In 1939 the Kennel Club acquired the world-famous Crufts dog show (founded 1891) following the death of its founder, Charles Cruft. Since that time, Crufts has been the Kennel Club's flagship event and is the biggest dog show in the world. Nowadays, the Kennel Club licences over 4,000 dog shows and events every year. The very first sport recognised by the Kennel Club was the sport of Field Trials which tests the skills of working gundogs. Other working dogs also got to show off their skills and be rewarded at competition with the development of the disciplines of Working Trials (1920s), Obedience (1950s) and Agility (1970s) all of which are governed by the Kennel Club. Since the 1990s, both Flyball and Heelwork to Music have become hugely popular with the British public and the new disciplines of Cani-Cross and Rally are gaining a dedicated following. Although Kennel Club was originally concerned just with pure-bred dogs, dog shows and trials, the Kennel Club now represents the interests of all responsible dog owners to ensure that dogs are welcome throughout society. In 1988, the Kennel Club published the Canine Code and in 1992 the Good Citizen Dog Scheme was set up to promote responsible dog ownership, to enhance our relationship with our pets and to make the community aware of the benefits associated with dog ownership. The Young Kennel Club was established in 1985 to help young dog lovers aged between 6-24 years learn new skills, build confidence and make new friends. Today, the YKC makes sure that our future dog owners, exhibitors, trainers and judges are ready to take on the challenge of making sure that all dogs get to live happy, healthy lives with responsible owners Source: The Kennel Club
  21. Koby

    Free Games Megathread

    https://store.steampowered.com/app/680360/Regions_Of_Ruin/ Regions of Ruin is currently free on Steam.
  22. AaronStC

    Hey

    Hey everyone! Not really sure what to say just introducing myself I guess.
  23. AaronStC

    The first anime you watch

    Probably Voltron (Golion) but I didn't know it at the time.
  24. Xykan

    Free Games Megathread

    https://www.epicgames.com/store/en-US/product/totally-accurate-battle-simulator/bug-dlc Totally Accurate Battle Simulator Bug DLC is free on Epic Game Store. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/maze-subject-360/9nx6q2rvkn93?activetab=pivot:overviewtab Maze Subject 360 is currently free on Microsoft Store. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/league-of-light-silent-mountain/9nl07jjzbqdz?activetab=pivot:overviewtab League of Light: Silent Mountain is currently free on Microsoft Store. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/fetch/9nbgwmr55vgx?activetab=pivot:overviewtab Fetch is currently free on Microsoft Store.
  25. Xykan

    Free Games Megathread

    https://store.steampowered.com/app/1052920/Caelus_Trident/ Caelus Trident is currently free on Steam. https://tentaclehead.itch.io/from-orbit From Orbit is currently free on Itch.io
  26. CardGames

    Recent Gaming Purchases?

    So much for playing Final Fantasy 7 Remake first. lol. Nier Automata Game of the Yorha Edition came today.
  27. DarkRavie

    New Game: What's the Word?

    What's the Word? - APPETENCY pronunciation: [APP-ə-dən-see] Part of speech: noun Origin: Latin, early 17th century meaning: 1. A longing or desire. 2. A natural tendency or affinity. Example: "Pickles and ice cream were the strangest appetency that popped up during her pregnancy." "My grandfather always had an appetency for woodworking and carving." About Appetency The Latin verb “appetere,” meaning to seek after, is the root of both appetency and appetite. In addition to the definition of a hunger, appetency also means a natural inclination for something. If you have an appetency for cooking, you might want to consider culinary school. Did you know? One definition of appentency, a longing or desire, is a synonym for appetite, but it has more of a strong craving attached to it. If you use appetency instead of appetite, there is probably an emotional hunger associated with your desire.
  28. DarkRavie

    Fact of the Day

    Fact of the Day - THE FRISBEE Did you know... that a frisbee is a gliding toy or sporting item that is generally made of injection molded plastic and roughly 8 to 10 inches in diameter with a pronounced lip? It is used recreationally and competitively for throwing and catching, as in flying disc games. (Wikipedia) Weird Fact: The inventor of the Frisbee was turned into one after his death. Walter Fredrick (Fred) Morrison invented the Pluto Platter in 1955 (the toy Wham-O eventually sold under the new name Frisbee). Fred Morrison, as he was commonly known, developed his disc idea when he became a pilot during World War II and suffered a period of imprisonment, and he finalised and commercialised his plastic invention in 1948 with Warren Franscioni, and called it a ‘Flying-Saucer’. When he died in 2010, his cremated remains were incorporated into one of the iconic toys. Everyone knows what a frisbee is. Yes, it’s that flying disc that you toss to a friend who then catches it and tosses it back. Well, it might not sound like a lot of fun, but that’s because you haven’t played ultimate frisbee yet. Ultimate frisbee is a game very similar to football or basketball where each team has a goal that they have to protect. Players on the team pass the frisbee to one another and try to get it into the opponent’s goal. A player can only pass the frisbee and is not allowed to move while holding onto it. Here are a few other things you didn’t know about ultimate frisbee. It’s Just ‘Ultimate’ Wham-O Toys incorporated trademarked the word ‘frisbee’ back when it was invented, so technically, it shouldn’t be used by anyone else. And since ultimate frisbee is an official game with an organisation and all that, they could be sued for copying the name. This is why the game is called ‘Ultimate’ instead. No Referees The game was first played at Columbia High way back in the 70s, and there were no referees in the first match. The players were simply expected to be honest enough to admit whether they had committed a foul. This sport is considered to be a ‘gentleman’s game’, and keeping with that spirit, even today a game of Ultimate is not watched by any referees. However, there are officials known as observers who simply watch the game and intercede only when there is a dispute that cannot be settled by the players. Rock, Paper, Scissors The rules of Ultimate Frisbee don’t state anything about determining which team is granted possession at the start of the game. Even today, instead of a coin toss, most players play a game of rock, paper, scissors to determine who starts the game. t’s A Part Of The World Games Officials are still in talks with the Olympic Committee to try and make Ultimate Frisbee a part of the Olympic games. And it seems like the sport will soon be added to the list of sports in the Olympics. For now, however, Ultimate Frisbee is already a part of the World Games and its popularity is steadily growing, The US won the gold medal in 2005, 2009, and 2013, and Canada won gold way back in 2001 when the sport was first added to the World Games. Bigger End Zones The end zones in Ultimate Frisbee are nearly twice as big as those in football. So while the field size of both sports is roughly the same, the actual playing area for Ultimate Frisbee is much smaller than the area in which football is played. And it has to be because it’s not easy (or possible) to throw a frisbee across 53 yards. ‘Frisbee’ Is A Registered Trademark Often, you will hear people refer to this sport as simply ‘ultimate.’ Have you ever stopped to wonder why? It is not just a way of shortening the name. Instead, it’s because ‘frisbee’ is a registered trademark of the Wham-O toy company, and therefore, technically, the name cannot and should not be used by anyone else. The term frisbee dates back to 1957, and the term is generally used to refer to all flying discs. Even the World Flying Disc Federation, the international governing body for Ultimate, risks getting sued if they use the name ‘Frisbee.’ Hence, the sport is called ‘Ultimate.’ The Game Could Have Been Known as ‘Pluto Platter ’ The frisbee idea came to Walter Frederick Morrison in his teenage years when he would throw lard popcorn tin lids with his girlfriend. Later on, Morrison came to discover that cake pans flew better than lard can lids and went on to develop a business called Flyin’ Cake Pans. While developing this business idea, Morrison played around with different names for his new game, including Flyin’ Saucer, Whirlo-Way, and Pluto Platter. So, there you have it, the game known as Ultimate Frisbee might as well have been called Pluto Platter. From Pluto Platter to Frisbee So how did the game transition from being called Pluto Platter to being known as Frisbee? There was a baking company known as Frisbie Baking Company, and it was based in Bridgeport, Connecticut. This company was popularly known for its pies, sold throughout New England in tins bearing the world ‘Frisbie’ stamped on them. Students at Yale, where the pies were supplied, would toss and catch the empty pie tins, and this would provide them with hours of entertainment. In 1957, on his 37th birthday, Morrison sold the rights to his invention to the Wham-O Toy Company. When Wham-O came to learn that students were calling Pluto Platter ‘Frisbie,’ after the pie tins, then they renamed the sport to Frisbee. A Gentleman’s Game Frisbee is a self-officiating game, and there are no referees involved. Players are expected to be honest and own up when they have omitted a foul. This spirit of the game goes back to 1968 when the first match was played at Columbia High School without there being any referees involved. Consequently, this became the culture of the sport, which is what makes it a gentleman’s game. There are no referees, but there are observers who are officials that watch the game and intervene only when there erupts a dispute which the players cannot settle amongst themselves. Being a non-contact sport further enhances the gentlemanly nature of the game. First Intercollegiate Game The first intercollegiate Ultimate Frisbee game was played on November 6th, 1972. The match was played between Princeton University and Rutgers University, and it took place in a parking lot. It was such a big deal that the New York Times covered the sporting event, and there were reportedly about 400 people in attendance. Rutgers ended up winning the game by 2 points, as the match had a score of 29-27. Now here’s a little fun fact about this first intercollegiate match: precisely 103 years ago, in 1869, the two teams played the first-ever football college game. The football game had the same winner and the same score difference as the Ultimate Frisbee game: Rutgers winning by 2 points. Ultimate Is Part of The World Games The International Olympic Committee (IOC) might not be too receptive to the idea of Ultimate Frisbee being incorporated as an Olympic event. However, Ultimate is part of the next best thing: The World Games. The World Games is a prestigious international sporting event that has over 30 sports disciplines. Ultimate Frisbee was included in the World Games docket in 2001 and has been a part of the World Games events since. This goes to prove that Ultimate Frisbee is an actual sport. Not just a pastime, you indulge in with your father while he sips a beer on the beach. Bigger Endzones Than in Football An ultimate frisbee field is 110m long by 37m wide, while an American football field is 110m long by 49m wide. The two fields are pretty much the same size, but the endzones in Ultimate are more than twice as deep as those in football. As a result, the playing area in Ultimate is of a much smaller size than the area in which football is played. For a good reason, though, because how often can you successfully throw a frisbee across a 49m distance? So, while an ultimate frisbee endzone is 23m deep, a football endzone is 9m deep. The Frisbee Made from A Man’s Remains Just how much do you enjoy playing Frisbee? Would you like for your ashes to be made into a frisbee after you’ve been cremated? Sounds slightly insane, no? Well, that’s just what happened to Fred Morrison. Fred passed away in 2010 at the age of 90. His dying wish was for his body to be cremated, and the ashes turned into “memorial disc” frisbees for his family. His wishes were respected. Upon cremation, his ashes were used to make several frisbees, which were then distributed amongst his family members. Over 200 Million Frisbee Sales Since acquiring the rights to Pluto Platter in 1957, the What-O Top Company reports having sold over 200 million frisbee discs. That’s quite an impressive figure. If the figures are correct, then that means there have been more Frisbee discs sold in the world than the number of soccer balls and basketballs that have been sold! Well, it’s entirely believable considering frisbee discs are smaller and cheaper and make for a more relaxed casual play than basketball and soccer. Besides, humankind has been hurling flat round objects since antiquity, so it comes as no surprise that ultimate Frisbee is a popular pastime. Antique Frisbee Discs Frisbee discs made before 1964 are considered antique collector’s items, and they cost a pretty penny. What would count as an antique disc could probably be a limited-edition disc, misprints of some discs, or discs signed by pro players. Branded discs can count too, such as ones bearing the Beatles or Led Zeppelin graphics. Besides, some discs are explicitly made for collectors, an example of this being the Ed Headrick Limited Last Flight Memorial Disc. The rarer limited-edition discs have been known to sell for as much as $500. Although not an antique, Geoffrey Parker has a leather flying disc that costs $305, so if you are inclined to the finer things in life, this luxury frisbee is just what you need. Conclusion I don’t know how comfortable you’d be tossing a $305 ultimate frisbee disc, but then again, I’m not a man of means, so what do I know? I’ll hold on to the one disc that holds a special place in my heart: my plastic frisbee. Whichever disc you are using, ultimate Frisbee is a game anyone can enjoy: old and young, men and women. Source: SportyGen
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